Study points to potential misuse/abuse of ADHD drugs

March 7, 2018, Wiley

A new British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology study indicates that methylphenidate, a central nervous system stimulant approved to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy, may be subject to misuse and/or abuse.

Using the French General Health Insurance database limited to two areas covering approximately 4 million individuals, investigators studied a group of 3534 new users of between 2010 and June 2013.

The pattern of use for children was consistent with guidelines, with regular visits to physicians, adequate dosage and long-duration of treatment. Patterns of use were quite different for adults, with some potentially abusive behaviors, in particular for adults aged 25-49 years.

Explore further: ADHD medications may reduce the risk of sexually transmitted infection

More information: V. Pauly et al, Patterns and profiles of Methylphenidate use in both children and adults, British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology (2018). DOI: 10.1111/bcp.13544

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