132-pound tumor removed from woman's abdomen

May 3, 2018
132-pound tumor removed from woman's abdomen
In this February 2018 photograph provided by the Danbury Hospital, a large tumor is prepared to be removed from a patient at the hospital in Danbury, Conn. Doctors removed the 132-pound tumor from a woman's abdomen, and she is expected to recover fully. The ovarian tumor was diagnosed after the 38-year-old woman reported rapid weight gain of about 10 pounds per week over a two-month period. (Danbury, Conn. Hospital via AP)

Doctors at a Connecticut hospital say they removed a 132-pound tumor from a woman's abdomen, and she is expected to recover fully.

The ovarian tumor was diagnosed after the 38-year-old woman reported rapid weight gain of about 10 pounds per week over a two-month period.

The doctors at Danbury Hospital announced Thursday that the five-hour surgery was completed successfully in February after extensive planning by a team of 25 clinical specialists.

The tumor was benign, but because it was sitting on a major blood vessel doctors say they were concerned about the patient's heart. The patient was also malnourished because the tumor was sitting on her digestive tract.

Pathologists have been conducting genetic tests on the tumor to learn why it grew so quickly.

Explore further: Woman resigned to being plump learns she had 140-pound tumor

Related Stories

Woman resigned to being plump learns she had 140-pound tumor

March 10, 2017
Mary Clancey said she was resigned to being a plump old lady. Over 15 years she kept getting bigger despite dieting. But with her health deteriorating, her son persuaded her to go to the hospital.

Huge tumor removed from pregnant Bolivian woman

March 22, 2012
Bolivian doctors said Thursday they have successfully removed a 15-kilogram (33-pound) tumor from a woman in her 35th week of pregnancy who has since given birth to a healthy baby girl.

Mexico doctors remove child's 33-pound tumor

June 27, 2012
(AP) — Mexican doctors say they have successfully removed a 33-pound (15-kilogram) benign tumor from the body of a 2-year-old child.

Imaging features predict tumor grade

January 30, 2018
The vast majority of meningiomas—tumors that form from the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord—are slow-growing and benign. "Atypical" meningiomas have a more aggressive clinical course, and patients with ...

Recommended for you

Researchers find pathways that uncover insight into development of lung cancer

August 17, 2018
Lung cancer is the leading cause of preventable cancer death. A disease of complex origin, lung cancer is usually considered to result from effects of smoking and from multiple genetic variants. One of these genetic components, ...

Scientists discover new method of diagnosing cancer with malaria protein

August 17, 2018
In a spectacular new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered a method of diagnosing a broad range of cancers at their early stages by utilising a particular malaria protein that sticks to cancer ...

Developing an on-off switch for breast cancer treatment

August 17, 2018
T-cells play an important role in the body's immune system, and one of their tasks is to find and destroy infection. However, T-cells struggle to identify solid, cancerous tumors in the body. A current cancer therapy is using ...

Pregnant? Eating broccoli sprouts may reduce child's chances of breast cancer later in life

August 16, 2018
Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have found that a plant-based diet is more effective in preventing breast cancer later in life for the child if the mother consumed broccoli while pregnant. The 2018 ...

Three scientists share $500,000 prize for work on cancer therapy

August 15, 2018
Tumors once considered untreatable have disappeared and people previously given months to live are surviving for decades thanks to new therapies emerging from the work of three scientists chosen to receive a $500,000 medical ...

PARP inhibitor improves progression-free survival in patients with advanced breast cancers

August 15, 2018
In a randomized, Phase III trial led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, the PARP inhibitor talazoparib extended progression-free survival (PFS) and improved quality-of-life measures over ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.