FDA to more aggressively tackle disruptive drug shortages

July 12, 2018 by Linda A. Johnson
FDA to more aggressively tackle disruptive drug shortages
This Oct. 14, 2015, file photo shows the Food and Drug Administration campus in Silver Spring, Md. The FDA said Thursday, July 12, 2018, it plans to more aggressively fight the persistent medication shortages that have led to rationing, disrupted hospital operations and even compromised patient care. It's a new approach for the drug regulator, which has typically waited until shortages began or were imminent to take action. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration wants to more aggressively fight medication shortages that recently have led to rationing of some drugs and disrupted hospital operations.

The FDA said Thursday that it's forming a to find ways to improve the supply of crucial drugs. It's a new approach for the drug regulator, which has no control over companies. It generally can't act until drugmakers say shortages are imminent.

Many shortages involve low-profit generic pills and injections that are hospital workhorses, like antibiotics and painkillers. Many are made by only a few companies so when production problems occur, other drugmakers can't make up for the shortfall.

Explore further: FDA names drugmakers accused of blocking cheaper generics

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