July 28 is World Hepatitis Day

July 27, 2018

(HealthDay)—July 28 is World Hepatitis Day, according to an announcement published in the July 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

The goal of the annual commemoration is to promote awareness and inspire action to prevent and treat viral hepatitis. This year's theme is "Test. Treat. Hepatitis," underscoring the need to scale up testing and treatment activities.

The World Health Organization estimates that globally, in 2015, approximately 325 million persons were infected with hepatitis B or C virus. The World Health Assembly has endorsed elimination goals set by the World Health Organization, defined as a global reduction of incidence by 90 percent and mortality by 65 percent by 2030.

2018 World Hepatitis Day is Saturday, July 28.

Explore further: WHO targets for chronic hepatitis B will be cost-effective

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World Hepatitis Day

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