Patients with early kidney cancer benefit from robotic partial nephrectomy

July 10, 2018, University of Southern California
Robotic urologic surgery demonstration. Credit: Ricardo Carrasco III

For patients with early kidney cancer, removing part of the kidney instead of the whole kidney is often a preferred treatment because the procedure can effectively remove tumors while preserving kidney function. But when it comes to the best surgical approach—robotic, laparoscopic or open—for this type of surgery, known as partial nephrectomy, the choice has been less clear. A comprehensive study by the Keck School of Medicine of USC, which has found that robotic partial nephrectomy offers significantly better patient outcomes, may help inform those decisions.

"Robotic has become increasingly more common, yet there's a lack of consensus among urologists about its performance vis-a-vis open or laparoscopic techniques," says the study's corresponding author Inderbir Gill, MD, chair and distinguished professor of urology at the Keck School. "Our goal with this study was to critically evaluate the impact of these three techniques on patient outcomes such as complications, and mortality."

The systematic review and meta-analysis, published in the August 2018 issue of The Journal of Urology, combined data from 98 studies on robotic, open and laparoscopic partial nephrectomy. More than 20,000 patients were included in the analysis.

When comparing robotic to open partial nephrectomy, the study found that robotic partial nephrectomy offered several superior , including decreased complications during and after surgery, cancer recurrence, overall mortality, hospital length of stay and readmission. There was no difference in cancer-specific mortality between the two techniques.

Results also showed that robotic partial nephrectomy was equivalent to, and sometimes better than, laparoscopic partial nephrectomy. While there was no difference in cancer recurrence, cancer-specific mortality, length of hospital stay or readmission, a robotic technique was associated with lower overall mortality and fewer complications during and after surgery.

Gill, who is the executive director of the USC Institute of Urology at Keck Medicine of USC, believes the data suggest that the technique of robotic partial has now become established in the field.

"Our study shows that is not only safe and effective but also a preferred approach for treating small kidney tumors," he says.

Kidney cancer is among the 10 most common cancers, affecting 1 in 48 men and 1 in 83 women. According to the American Cancer Society, the rate of has been rising since the 1990s, but the mortality rate has decreased slightly since then. The society predicts that about 63,000 Americans will be diagnosed with kidney cancer this year.

Explore further: Superior morbidity profile for robotic partial nephrectomy

More information: Giovanni E. Cacciamani et al, Impact of Surgical Factors on Robotic Partial Nephrectomy Outcomes: Comprehensive Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis, The Journal of Urology (2018). DOI: 10.1016/j.juro.2017.12.086

Related Stories

Superior morbidity profile for robotic partial nephrectomy

October 20, 2016
(HealthDay)—Compared with laparoscopic partial nephrectomy, robotic partial nephrectomy is associated with a superior morbidity profile, according to a meta-analysis published in the November issue of The Journal of Urology.

Study examines different types of surgery for kidney cancer

August 1, 2016
For completely endophytic kidney tumors, which grow inward, both open partial nephrectomy (OPN) and robotic partial nephrectomy (RPN) led to excellent patient outcomes in a recent study.

Robot-assisted kidney cancer surgery offers many benefits, but at a cost

May 7, 2013
Robot-assisted surgery to remove kidney cancers has seen a rapid increase in use, and has both replaced and proven safer than laparoscopic procedures for the same purpose, according to a study by the Vattikuti Urology Institute ...

Study: Kidney cancer patients preserve kidney function with robot-assisted partial nephrectomy

January 13, 2014
Patients with chronic kidney disease who received robot-assisted partial nephrectomy to treat kidney cancer have minimal loss of kidney function—a smaller amount even than patients with normal kidney function, according ...

Kidney cancer patients do better when whole kidney is not removed

April 17, 2012
Kidney cancer patients who had only their tumor removed had better survival than patients who had their entire kidney removed, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Recommended for you

Surgery unnecessary for many prostate cancer patients

December 13, 2018
Otherwise healthy men with advanced prostate cancer may benefit greatly from surgery, but many with this diagnosis have no need for it. These conclusions were reached by researchers after following a large group of Scandinavian ...

Combining three treatment strategies may significantly improve melanoma treatment

December 12, 2018
A study by a team led by a Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigator finds evidence that combining three advanced treatment strategies for malignant melanoma—molecular targeted therapy, immune checkpoint blockade ...

An integrated approach to finding new treatments for breast cancer

December 12, 2018
Unraveling the complexity of cancer biology can lead to the identification new molecules involved in breast cancer and prompt new avenues for drug development. And proteogenomics, an integrated, multipronged approach, seems ...

Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

December 12, 2018
A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth—this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, ...

Researchers use computer model to predict prostate cancer progression

December 12, 2018
An international team of cancer researchers from Denmark and Germany have used cancer patient data to develop a computer model that can predict the progression of prostate cancer. The model is currently being implemented ...

New insight into stem cell behaviour highlights therapeutic target for cancer treatment

December 12, 2018
Research led by the University of Plymouth and Technische Universität Dresden has identified a new therapeutic target for cancer treatment and tissue regeneration – a protein called Prominin-1.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.