Study finds no strong evidence that cannabis reduces chronic pain

July 4, 2018 by Marion Downey, University of New South Wales
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

A four-year study suggests medicinal cannabis is not as effective at relieving chronic non-cancer pain as commonly assumed.

Researchers at UNSW Sydney who conducted one of the world's longest community studies of its type have found no clear role for in treating chronic non-cancer .

The study, funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council and led by the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC) at UNSW Sydney, found that participants who were using cannabis reported over a series of assessments they were experiencing greater pain and anxiety, were coping less well with their pain, and reported that pain was interfering more in their life, compared to those not using cannabis. There was no clear evidence that cannabis led to reduced pain severity or pain interference or led participants to reduce their opioid use or dose.

The four-year Pain and Opioids IN Treatment (POINT) study is one of the world's longest in-depth community studies on pharmaceutical opioids and chronic non-cancer pain. Researchers examined the effect of cannabis on participants' pain, on the extent to which pain interfered with their everyday life, and on their prescribed opioid use.

The use of cannabis for medicinal purposes has been increasing worldwide, and chronic non-cancer pain is the most common reason cited for medicinal use. There has been speculation that using cannabis for pain may also allow people to reduce their prescribed opioid use. To date however, long-term evidence has been limited: randomised control trials of cannabis for pain typically have short durations of generally three months and tend to exclude patients with complex physical and mental problems; and there have been no controlled studies of the potential "opioid sparing" effects.

For the POINT study, participants were recruited through community pharmacies and completed comprehensive assessments of their pain, physical and mental health, medication and cannabis use annually. Approximately 80% of the sample completed each assessment. Participants had been in pain for a median of 10 years and taken prescribed opioids for their pain for a median of four years. There were very high rates of physical and mental health problems.

The results, published in Lancet Public Health, suggest that there is a need for caution because a clear role for cannabis in treating chronic non-cancer pain was not found.

"Chronic non-cancer pain is a complex problem. For most people, there is unlikely to be a single effective treatment," said lead author Dr. Gabrielle Campbell.

"In our study of people living with chronic non-cancer pain who were prescribed pharmaceutical opioids, despite reporting perceived benefits from cannabis use, we found no strong evidence that cannabis use reduced participants' pain or use over time."

The article, Effect of cannabis use in people with chronic non-cancer pain prescribed opioids: findings from a 4-year prospective cohort study, is available online via Lancet Public Health.

Explore further: Given the choice, patients will reach for cannabis over prescribed opioids

More information: Gabrielle Campbell et al. Effect of cannabis use in people with chronic non-cancer pain prescribed opioids: findings from a 4-year prospective cohort study, The Lancet Public Health (2018). DOI: 10.1016/S2468-2667(18)30110-5

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SKULLTRAP
not rated yet Jul 04, 2018
I agree. Cannabis for me, intensifies pain. Just give me Dilaudid post-op. I can see in the future they'll replace opioids with ganj, & that would be bad news for me.
mqr
not rated yet Jul 04, 2018
States where cannabis is legal have an immediate reduction in consumption of pain killers, it means that it acts as a substitute.
Anonym
not rated yet Jul 09, 2018
My personal experience after breaking six ribs and being sent home from the hospital with Vicodin and Lyrica, plus several other medications to ameliorate those drugs' side-effects, was this: after smoking a joint, the pain was diminished enough that I immediately cut back to 1 Vicodin, and while continuing to smoke pot, stopped taking pain pills altogether on the second day at home.

Does it really matter if the effect is placebo or not? Even if it is, pot obviously is working for many people and will continue to work for them because they believe in the medicine, until enough "science" has accumulated to convince people it doesn't/never did work. There is, I suspect, such a thing as a "negative" placebo effect, too.

But whose purposes does such "science" serve?

drmom_medical
not rated yet Jul 09, 2018
Lyrica and NSAIDs give me side effects. The 'cotton mouth' from CBD makes it undesirable. Marijuana pills did nothing for my bone pain. It takes 5mg. of oxycontin to allow me to sleep when it's bad.
baronbastait
not rated yet Jul 21, 2018
Interesting to note that "frequency of use in the last month: none" in the 4 year study was 86-91% of the individuals. Also, "The most common reasons for discontinuing cannabis use included side-effects, lack of efficacy, access difficulties, and legal concerns." was mentioned but not measured... access and quality were not addressed either. So please note that Australia legalized medical marijuana in 2016, however cannabis it is difficult to obtain.
I see MANY large wholes in this study done by Australia's National Drug and Alcohol Research Center (NDARC).

Read the study yourself (that the article does not provide)

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