How not to go viral

July 10, 2018 by David Bradley, Inderscience
Ebola virus particles (red) on a larger cell. Credit: NIAID

The spread of the viral disease Ebola is a major worldwide health concern. Recent outbreaks in Africa have ultimately been well controlled, but a new emergence could occur and cause significant loss of life not only to those local to the epidemic but across the globe as the disease can spread so quickly with international air travel.

Researchers in China have investigated the logistics and dynamics of how Ebola spreads with the hope that their model can inform a future response to an outbreak quickly and effectively before it spreads.

Moreover, the approach ensures minimal cost, which is important given that emergence of the lethal hemorrhagic commonly occurs in undeveloped and developing nations.

Explore further: Five new suspected Ebola cases reported in Congo's northwest

More information: Jia Ming Zhu et al. The spread pattern on Ebola and the control schemes, International Journal of Innovative Computing and Applications (2018). DOI: 10.1504/IJICA.2018.092590

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