Gains in insurance coverage seen for lesbian, gay, bisexual adults

September 13, 2018

(HealthDay)—Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) adults report continued problems affording care despite coverage gains offered by the Affordable Care Act, according to a study published in the August issue of Health Affairs.

Kevin H. Nguyen, from Brown University in Providence, R.I., and colleagues used data from three waves of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to examine disparities in access to a personal doctor, affordability of care, type of , and self-reported health in LGB adults (January 2014 to February 2017) in 31 states that implemented the system's sexual orientation module.

The researchers found that, LGB adults reported similar rates of insurance coverage and comparable access to a personal doctor and routine checkups, relative to their straight peers. However, compared to straight adults, more LGB adults reported avoiding necessary care because of cost and worse self-reported health outcomes, even if they had health insurance.

"More LGB adults reported having individually purchased insurance, which suggests that the repeal of the ACA's individual mandate may create challenges in the affordability of necessary care," the authors write.

Explore further: Despite ACA, lesbian, gay and bisexual adults still have trouble affording health care

More information: Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

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