HbA1c variability is a strong predictor of mortality in T2DM

HbA1c variability is a strong predictor of mortality in T2DM
(HealthDay)—Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) variability may be a more powerful predictor of all-cause mortality with type 2 diabetes than average HbA1c, according to a study published in the August issue of Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

Emanuela Orsi, M.D., from the University of Milan, and colleagues assessed three to five HbA1c measures for 8,290 patients during the two-year period (seen at nine centers) before enrollment in the Renal Insufficiency And Cardiovascular Events Italian multicenter study.

The researchers found that the measures of HbA1c variability increased according to quartiles of average HbA1c, and vice versa. There was an association between average HbA1c and measures of HbA1c variability with all-cause . Mortality increased with quartiles of average HbA1c, intra-individual standard deviation (HbA1c-SD), SD adjusted for the number of HbA1c assessments, and coefficient of variation. However, after adjustment for confounders and/or each other measure, only the association with HbA1c variability measures remained. Mortality risk was lower for HbA1c-SD below the median and higher for HbA1c-SD above the median, regardless of whether average HbA1c was below or above the median, in fully adjusted models.

"HbA1c variability is a strong, independent predictor of all-cause mortality in type 2 diabetes and appears to be even more powerful than average HbA1c in predicting mortality," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.


Explore further

Increased first-trimester HbA1c predicts gestational diabetes

More information: Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Citation: HbA1c variability is a strong predictor of mortality in T2DM (2018, September 21) retrieved 25 June 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-09-hba1c-variability-strong-predictor-mortality.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more