Religious upbringing linked to better health and well-being during early adulthood

September 14, 2018, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Participating in spiritual practices during childhood and adolescence may be a protective factor for a range of health and well-being outcomes in early adulthood, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Researchers found that people who attended weekly religious services or practiced daily prayer or meditation in their youth reported greater life satisfaction and positivity in their 20s—and were less likely to subsequently have depressive symptoms, smoke, use illicit drugs, or have a sexually transmitted infection—than people raised with less regular spiritual habits.

"These findings are important for both our understanding of health and our understanding of parenting practices," said first author Ying Chen, who recently completed her postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard Chan School. "Many children are raised religiously, and our study shows that this can powerfully affect their health behaviors, mental health, and overall happiness and well-being."

The study was published online September 13, 2018 in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

Previous studies have linked adults' religious involvement to and well-being outcomes, including lower risk of premature death.

For this study, Chen and senior author Tyler VanderWeele, John L. Loeb and Frances Lehman Loeb Professor of Epidemiology, analyzed health data from mothers in the Nurses' Health Study II (NHSII) and their children in the Growing Up Today Study (GUTS). The sample included more than 5,000 youth who were followed for between 8-14 years. The researchers controlled for many variables such as maternal health, , and history of substance abuse or , to try to isolate the effect of religious upbringing.

The results showed that people who attended religious services at least weekly in childhood and adolescence were approximately 18% more likely to report higher happiness as young adults (ages 23-30) than those who never attended services. They were also 29% more likely to volunteer in their communities and 33% less likely to use .

Those who prayed or meditated at least daily while growing up were 16% more likely to report higher happiness as young adults, 30% less likely to have started having sex at a young age, and 40% less likely to have a sexually transmitted infection compared to those who never prayed or meditated.

"While decisions about religion are not shaped principally by health, for adolescents who already hold religious beliefs, encouraging service attendance and private practices may be meaningful avenues to protect against some of the dangers of adolescence, including depression, substance abuse, and risk taking. In addition, these practices may positively contribute to happiness, volunteering, a greater sense of mission and purpose, and to forgiveness," said VanderWeele.

One limitation of the study is that it consisted mainly of children of white females of relatively high family socioeconomic status, and therefore might not be generalizable to a broader population, though prior research by VanderWeele suggested the effects of religious service attendance for adults may be even larger for black versus white populations. Another limitation was that the study did not look at the influences of parents and peers on adolescents' religious decisions.

While previous studies of adult populations have found religious service attendance to have a greater association with better and well-being than prayer or meditation, the current study of adolescents found communal and private spiritual practices to be of roughly similar benefit.

Chen is now a research scientist with the Harvard Institute for Quantitative Social Science's Human Flourishing Program, which VanderWeele directs.

Explore further: Religious service attendance associated with lower suicide risk among women

More information: Ying Chen et al, Associations of Religious Upbringing With Subsequent Health and Well-Being From Adolescence to Young Adulthood: An Outcome-Wide Analysis, American Journal of Epidemiology (2018). DOI: 10.1093/aje/kwy142

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TorbjornLarsson
not rated yet Sep 16, 2018
Globally religiosity is correlated with insecurity such as poverty, so they are looking ta the wrong social strata for a general model. Scandinavia or scientists constitute obvious counter example statistics, where non-religiosity is correlated with better health and well-being, while AFAIK more religious states in US itself correlates with poorer sexual outcomes (more STD, more abortion, less sexual knowledge, et cetera).

To no surprise, when I googled "The Human Flourishing Program", it has a section on "Religious Communities" where 2 of 3 aims are to see how religious communities affect "flourishing" and - oy - "to make contributions towards a theology of health."

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