New research shows drinking No 1 Rosemary Water improves memory by up to 15 percent

October 15, 2018, SAGE Publications

New research published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, has shown that drinking a concentrated rosemary extract drink, No 1 Rosemary Water, can boost cognitive and memory performance by up to 15%.

The research conducted by Dr. Mark Moss at Northumbria University, is the first piece to be published on the benefit of drinking rosemary extract. The experiment used concentrated rosemary shots from No1 Rosemary Water, the only commercially available drink that combines rosemary extract with spring and no other additives.

The newly published research builds on Dr. Moss' earlier trials showing the benefits of rosemary aroma in boosting function.

About the trial—key findings

Dr. Mark Moss and the team conducted a series of tests to measure cognitive performance, focusing on memory.

These tests were designed to assess the participants' capability to retain and manipulate information. Across a number of tests, the group drinking No1 Rosemary Water saw an improvement in their ability to recall information and complete their cognitive tasks.

The test participants were each given 250ml of concentrated No1 Rosemary Water. 20 minutes after ingesting the shots, the experimental group performed the tasks while having their brain blood flow measured to assess how efficiently the body was extracting energy compared to the control group.

Those drinking No1 Rosemary Water shots saw an average increase of 15% in performance as well as an increase in the levels of deoxygenated red blood cells flowing through their brain. The researchers believe this indicates that the brain is extracting the energy it requires to perform the task more efficiently.

Bullets of findings:

  • Long-term and working memory tasks—15% average improvement in a series of selected memory tasks in experimental group compared to placebo group. The current study therefore supports the body of evidence that rosemary has the potential for enhancing some memory-based aspects of cognitive functioning.
  • Brain blood flow—statistically significant increased levels of deoxygenated blood in the brain compared to placebo group. The study is the first evidence of a cerebrovascular benefit from the ingestion of rosemary and suggests improved extraction of oxygen in the control group during cognitive tasks.

Dr. Mark Moss believes this study adds to the accumulation of studies already carried out suggesting that "rosemary offers a number of interesting possible health promoting applications, from antioxidant and anti-microbial to hepatoprotective and antitumorigenic activity."

In particular, the team believe the presence of 1,8-cineole and rosmarinic acid, both found in No1 Rosemary Water, may be important in delivering improved cognitive performance.

He went on; "The results of this research show there are statistically reliable improvements in memory function thanks to the ingestion of No1 Rosemary Water. In fact, I'd say that the shots act like a turbo charger for the brain."

No1 Rosemary Water is developed using a unique and secret combination of extraction processes. The team use only fresh rosemary (not dried) and the herb is cold brewed to ensure that all the active compounds found in nature are extracted. This is not a flavour or essence.

History of rosemary

Throughout history, rosemary has been famous for its medicinal properties and its ability to improve memory.

From the alchemists of the past to modern day practitioners of aromatherapy, there is widespread acknowledgement of its power and benefits.

Rosemary has in fact, been associated with memory enhancement since ancient times. Ancient Greek students wore garlands of rosemary in exams and it has been referred to in literature of all kinds, as the herb of remembrance for hundreds of years.

Shakespeare's Hamlet, Act 4: Scene 5: "There's , that's for remembrance. Pray you, love, remember."

Today, science may finally be able to prove them right.

Explore further: Rosemary aroma can aid children's working memory

More information: Mark Moss et al. Acute ingestion of rosemary water: Evidence of cognitive and cerebrovascular effects in healthy adults, Journal of Psychopharmacology (2018). DOI: 10.1177/0269881118798339

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