Psychology & Psychiatry

Positive outlook predicts less memory decline

We may wish some memories could last a lifetime, but many physical and emotional factors can negatively impact our ability to retain information throughout life.

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Identifying early symptoms of Alzheimer's disease

When a 60-year-old tells her nurse she's been forgetting things—a dinner night with friends, a neighbor's name, or to call for a grandchild's birthday, for instance—the nurse may respond several different ways: The nurse ...

Neuroscience

Time-keeping brain protein influences memory

Upsetting the brain's timekeeping can cause cognitive impairments, like when jetlag makes you feel foggy and forgetful. These impairments may stem from disrupting a protein that aligns the brain's time-keeping mechanism to ...

Neuroscience

A step closer to mapping the rodent brain

The rodent Hippocampal formation is one of the most exhaustively studied regions in the mammalian brain but until now, there has not been a comprehensive knowledge base of its synaptic physiology. In a front cover paper published ...

Vaccination

Vaccines are important—but what are they, and how do they work?

To say that the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted our lives would be an understatement. Since March, when stay-at-home orders were first put in place, many of us have spent our time in our homes, avoiding crowds, wearing masks, ...

page 1 from 100

Memory

In psychology, memory is an organism's mental ability to store, retain and recall information. Traditional studies of memory began in the fields of philosophy, including techniques of artificially enhancing the memory. The late nineteenth and early twentieth century put memory within the paradigms of cognitive psychology. In recent decades, it has become one of the principal pillars of a branch of science called cognitive neuroscience, an interdisciplinary link between cognitive psychology and neuroscience.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA