Psychology & Psychiatry

Aphantasia explained: Some people can't form mental pictures

How many times have you watched a book adaptation on film or TV, and felt disappointed when a scene wasn't quite how you'd pictured it? Or perhaps a character looked nothing like you'd imagined them to look?

Neuroscience

First glimpse of brains retrieving mistaken memories observed

Scientists have observed for the first time what it looks like in the key memory region of the brain when a mistake is made during a memory trial. The findings have implications for Alzheimer's disease research and advancements ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Deficient immune cells implicated in TB disease progression

Nearly a quarter of the world's population is estimated to be infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), the pathogen that causes tuberculosis, but less than 15 percent of infected individuals develop the disease.

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Memory

In psychology, memory is an organism's mental ability to store, retain and recall information. Traditional studies of memory began in the fields of philosophy, including techniques of artificially enhancing the memory. The late nineteenth and early twentieth century put memory within the paradigms of cognitive psychology. In recent decades, it has become one of the principal pillars of a branch of science called cognitive neuroscience, an interdisciplinary link between cognitive psychology and neuroscience.

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