Neuroscience

Why nerve cells in the brain process information differently

The dentate gyrus is the "input point" for the hippocampus part of the brain. It transmits information from the short term memory to the long term. It consists of granule cells, which are especially dense in this area of ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Sleep helps memory, right? Not for eyewitnesses

New research investigating the effect of sleep on eyewitness memory has found that having a period of sleep, compared to a period of wake, does not improve eyewitness identification accuracy.

Immunology

Simulating amino acid starvation may improve dengue vaccines

Eating a low-calorie diet can help you live longer and prevent age-related diseases—and even improve the immune system's function. A new study finds that, in mice, a compound used in herbal medicine can give a similar immune ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Predicting Alzheimer's disease-like memory loss before it strikes

For a person with Alzheimer's disease, there's no turning back the clock. By the time she begins to experience memory loss and other worrisome signs, cognitive decline has already set in. And decades of clinical trials have ...

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Memory

In psychology, memory is an organism's mental ability to store, retain and recall information. Traditional studies of memory began in the fields of philosophy, including techniques of artificially enhancing the memory. The late nineteenth and early twentieth century put memory within the paradigms of cognitive psychology. In recent decades, it has become one of the principal pillars of a branch of science called cognitive neuroscience, an interdisciplinary link between cognitive psychology and neuroscience.

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