Abuse and neglect associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk for lesbian and bisexual women

November 5, 2018, American Heart Association
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Trauma, including abuse and neglect, is associated with higher cardiovascular disease risk for lesbian and bisexual women, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018.

Sexual minority (lesbian and bisexual) women are more likely than heterosexual women to be stressed, use tobacco, binge drink and be obese. Why these occur more among sexual minority women isn't clear, but some think abuse, neglect and other trauma plays a role.

Researchers studied 547 sexual minority women, measuring three forms of childhood trauma: physical abuse, sexual abuse and parental neglect; three forms of adult trauma: physical abuse, sexual abuse and intimate partner violence; and lifetime trauma, which was the sum of childhood and adulthood trauma. They analyzed how increasing trauma severity was associated with higher report of several cardiovascular risk factors.

Researchers found sexual minority women with increased severity of childhood, adulthood or lifetime trauma had higher risk for posttraumatic stress disorder and a perception of less social support.

Researchers also found the studied women were:

  • 30 percent more likely to have anxiety if they experienced more forms of adulthood trauma.
  • 41 percent more likely to be depressed if they reported increased forms of childhood trauma and 22 percent more likely to be depressed if they had experienced more forms of lifetime trauma.
  • 44 percent more likely to report overeating in the past three months if they experienced increased forms of childhood trauma.
  • 58 percent more likely to have diabetes if they experienced increasing severity of , and lifetime trauma notably increased their risks of obesity and high blood pressure.

These findings suggest healthcare providers should screen for as a factor in this population, according to the authors.

The research was recognized as the "Cardiovascular Stroke Nursing Best Abstract Award."

Explore further: Early trauma may be risk factor for anxiety and depression in adults with head/neck cancer

Related Stories

Early trauma may be risk factor for anxiety and depression in adults with head/neck cancer

August 6, 2018
Among individuals with head and neck cancer (HNC), those who experienced childhood trauma were more likely to have advanced cancer, to have higher alcohol consumption, and to experience symptoms of anxiety and depression. ...

Sexual abuse as a child changes the body's biochemical response to stress

October 9, 2018
]Anxious depression, often resulting from childhood trauma, causes body changes which mean that standard depression treatments are often ineffective, according to new research presented at the ECNP in Barcelona.

Screening women veterans with fibromyalgia for childhood abuse may improve treatment

August 8, 2018
A new study has shown that women Veterans being treated for fibromyalgia exhibit high rates of childhood abuse.

Interpersonal psychotherapy helps depressed women with histories of sexual trauma

October 4, 2018
Women sexually abused in childhood and adolescence who suffer from depression and post-traumatic stress disorder benefit significantly from Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Trauma, according to a Rutgers researcher.

Military-related trauma tied to eating disorder symptoms

October 1, 2017
(HealthDay)—Noncombat, military-related trauma is associated with eating disorder symptom severity in male veterans, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

Increased prevalence of depression, PTSD and medical conditions among military personnel who experience trauma

May 7, 2018
Service members who experience trauma, including sexual trauma, during their service are at increased risk of major depressive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and chronic medical conditions, according to new ...

Recommended for you

Newborn babies' brain responses to being touched on the face measured for the first time

November 16, 2018
A newborn baby's brain responds to being touched on the face, according to new research co-led by UCL.

Sucking your baby's pacifier may benefit their health

November 16, 2018
Many parents probably think nothing of sucking on their baby's pacifier to clean it after it falls to the ground. Turns out, doing so may benefit their child's health.

Genetic analysis links obesity with diabetes, coronary artery disease

November 16, 2018
A Cleveland Clinic genetic analysis has found that obesity itself, not just the adverse health effects associated with it, significantly increases the risk of Type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. The paper was published ...

Non-coding genetic variant could improve key vascular functions

November 15, 2018
Atherosclerotic disease, the slow and silent hardening and narrowing of the arteries, is a leading cause of mortality worldwide. It is responsible for more than 15 million deaths each year, including an estimated 610,000 ...

No link between 'hypoallergenic' dogs and lower risk of childhood asthma

November 15, 2018
Growing up with dogs is linked to a lower risk of asthma, especially if the dogs are female, a new study from Karolinska Institutet and Uppsala University in Sweden shows. However, the researchers found no relation between ...

Study of two tribes sheds light on role of Western-influenced diet in blood pressure

November 14, 2018
A South American tribe living in near-total isolation with no Western dietary influences showed no increase in average blood pressure from age one to age 60, according to a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.