Study finds 45 minutes of patient education improves chronic disease management

November 19, 2018, American Osteopathic Association

Just 45 minutes of patient education can improve outcomes for patients with chronic diseases, according to a study in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.

The study, titled The Other 45, assigned 47 who were diagnosed with a chronic disease, like hypertension, COPD, or diabetes, to visit with a second-year for 45 minutes after seeing their . That one-on-one session measurably improved patients' attitudes and abilities in self-managing their care.

Patients also had subsequent follow-up appointments with the students at three weeks and three months after their initial session, and were assessed on a 40 -point questionnaire. Results at both points demonstrated consistent improvement in patients' willingness and capacity to be able to self-manage their care.

"Patients reported a greater understanding of their chronic disease and feeling better equipped to manage their health," said Alexis Stoner, Ph.D., director of Preventive Medicine and Public Health at Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine and lead author of this study. "This is encouraging because these diseases typically require patients to take on a lot of responsibility in their care, often through changes in lifestyle."

The Other 45 directed its efforts to an underserved community, noting the population's higher rates of chronic disease coupled with less exposure and access to accurate health information. By the end of the third visit, patients reported increased confidence in navigating the healthcare system, self-monitoring and insight, and skill and technique acquisition. They also reported decreased emotional distress.

Prior research has demonstrated that educating patients and getting them engaged in their own care significantly improves outcomes and reduces unnecessary medical costs.

Study authors acknowledge that most hospitals and physician practices don't have access to medical who can devote time to patient education. However, they note that nurses, physician assistants or health lifestyle advisors could fill the role.

"As physicians are increasingly held to the standards of value-based care, building in time and staff for patient education will prove critical to demonstrating success," said Stoner.

Explore further: Affordable health care means better access to diabetes prevention, management

More information: Alexis M. Stoner et al, The Other 45: Improving Patients' Chronic Disease Self-Management and Medical Students' Communication Skills, The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association (2018). DOI: 10.7556/jaoa.2018.155

Related Stories

Affordable health care means better access to diabetes prevention, management

November 14, 2018
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 100 million Americans are either living with diabetes or have higher than average blood sugar levels consistent with prediabetes.

Primary care strategies to improve health of chronic disease patients

October 3, 2018
Improving primary care for patients with chronic illness is critical to improving healthcare quality, value and patient experience. Primary care providers are participating in several new payment models that emphasize quality ...

Two strategies for preventing diabetes in minority patients

August 16, 2018
(HealthDay)—Recognizing the barriers to care for minority patients with type 2 diabetes could reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes nationwide, according to an article published by the American Medical Association's AMA ...

Care coordination improves health of older patients with multiple chronic diseases

August 27, 2018
For older adults with multiple chronic diseases, such as diabetes, depression, heart disease and others, care coordination appears to have the biggest impact on better health, according to a study published in CMAJ (Canadian ...

Centralized population health coordinators improve care for patients with chronic disease

December 12, 2017
A centralized chronic disease management program produced significant improvements in the care of patients with diabetes, hypertension or cardiovascular disease treated at practices in the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) ...

Using lung function tests to diagnose COPD can help patients and reduce health care costs

November 14, 2016
Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) would benefit if pulmonary function testing was used more consistently to diagnose the condition, according to a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal)

Recommended for you

Removing sweets from checkouts linked to dramatic fall in unhealthy snack purchases

December 18, 2018
Policies aimed at removing sweets and crisps from checkouts could lead to a dramatic reduction to the amount of unhealthy food purchased to eat 'on the go' and a significant reduction in that purchased to take home, suggests ...

Junk food diet raises depression risk, researchers find

December 18, 2018
A diet of fast food, cakes and processed meat increases your risk of depression, according to researchers at Manchester Metropolitan University.

Children of problem drinkers more likely to marry someone with a drinking problem: study

December 18, 2018
Children of parents who have alcohol use disorder are more likely to get married under the age of 25, less likely to get married later in life, and more likely to marry a person who has alcohol use disorder themselves, according ...

Folate deficiency creates hitherto unknown problems in connection with cell division

December 17, 2018
Folate deficiency creates more problems in connection with DNA replication than researchers had hitherto assumed, researchers from the University of Copenhagen show in a new study. Once a person lacks folate, the damage caused ...

A co-worker's rudeness can affect your sleep—and your partner's, study finds

December 14, 2018
Rudeness. Sarcastic comments. Demeaning language. Interrupting or talking over someone in a meeting. Workplace incivilities such as these are becoming increasingly common, and a new study from Portland State University and ...

Study shows magnesium optimizes vitamin D status

December 14, 2018
A randomized trial by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researchers indicates that magnesium optimizes vitamin D status, raising it in people with deficient levels and lowering it in people with high levels.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.