Radio-wave therapy proves effective against liver cancer cells

Radio-wave therapy proves effective against liver cancer cells
Left hand image: Patient with metastatic cancer affecting various organs receiving first AM RF EMF systemic targeted treatment. Blue arrows indicate site of tumor with red lesions. Right hand image: Patient with complete and partial responses following months of AM RF EMF systemic targeted treatment. Light brown lesions indicate residual tumor following treatment with AM RF EMF. Credit: Wake Forest School of Medicine

A new targeted therapy using non-thermal radio waves has been shown to block the growth of liver cancer cells anywhere in the body without damaging healthy cells, according to a study conducted by scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine, part of Wake Forest Baptist Health.

The study findings are published in the May 31 online edition of the journal EBioMedicine, a Lancet publication.

Using animal models, the research team headed by Boris Pasche, M.D., Ph.D., chair of biology and director of the Comprehensive Cancer Center at Wake Forest Baptist, delivered levels of radio frequencies to mice that had been injected with human cancer cells to replicate hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common type of liver cancer.

The radio frequencies were the same as those delivered to patients with HCC in Europe where the device has been approved for use in people.

"Our study showed that the radiofrequency delivered was at low and safe levels," Pasche said. "It was actually lower than those generated by holding a close to the ear."

The research team utilized a device, invented by Pasche and Alexandre Barbault, of TheraBionic GmbH in Ettlingen, Germany, that delivered cancer-specific, amplitude-modulated radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (AM RF EMF) programmed specifically for HCC. The AM RF EMF activated a calcium channel on the surface of HCC tumor cells but not on noncancerous cells, Pasche said.

"We discovered that a specific , Cav3.2, was acting like an antenna for the radio signals we sent out, which allowed calcium to penetrate the HCC cell membrane and go into the cell, triggering HCC growth arrest," Pasche said.

"Our team found it was the influx of calcium that stopped the growth of HCC cells and shrunk, and in some cases eliminated, the tumors. This effect was the same even if the cancer had metastasized to other parts of the body."

The team's next step will be to identify the exact signaling cascade within the tumor cell that leads to the anti-cancer effects, Pasche said.

A separate study by Wake Forest Baptist researchers using the same technology with breast cancer also is published in the May 31 edition of EBioMedicine.

The device, which is licensed to TheraBionic Inc., formerly TheraBionic LLC, and TheraBionic GmbH, has been approved by the European Notified Body, the equivalent of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It is currently under review by the FDA. Pasche and Barbault hold stock in TheraBionic Inc. and TheraBionic GmbH.

The treatment, which is approved for use in patients in Europe, consists of a hand-held device about the size of a VHS tape cassette that emits radio frequencies via a spoon-shaped element that is placed on the patient's tongue. The treatment is administered at the patient's home three times a day for one hour. The frequencies used are specific to the patient's type of cancer as identified through tumor biopsies or blood work, Pasche said.

Pasche and Barbault have discovered radio frequencies for 15 different types of cancer, as previously reported in a study published in 2009 in the Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research.


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Journal information: EBioMedicine

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May 31, 2019
Raymond royal rife carried out similar radio frequency work back in the 20's 30's resonating pathogens with multiple frequencies to render them inert

he also built in partnership with Zeiss a microscope using quarts lenses that could see young the diffraction limit

Jun 01, 2019
We have been assured by industry and government that non-ionizing radiation has no effect on cellular activity --- that is why, we are told, we need not fear our mobile phones: they emit non-ionizing radiation, i.e., radio frequency waves, and don't cause glioblastomas.

Well, here apparently is proof that is not the case. I notice the article never refers to the use of non-ionizing radiation on these patients.

Jun 01, 2019
We have been assured by industry and government that non-ionizing radiation has no effect on cellular activity


Nope. That's a mispresentation of the point. When you feel the warmth of the sun on your hand, that's non-ionizing radiation that very much affects your cellular activity.

that is why, we are told, we need not fear our mobile phones: they emit non-ionizing radiation, i.e., radio frequency waves, and don't cause glioblastomas.


No, it's because there isn't any reason why cellular frequencies would affect your DNA to cause cancer - no plausible mechanism of action such as these calcium ion channel resonances has ever been identified even in theory for the range of frequencies use in cellphones - and the evidence for any effect is so weak that it's essentially just random noise and errors.

(or blasting lab rats with such high power radio waves that they become physically stressed)

Jun 01, 2019
That said, this whole gadget sounds like a hoax anyways.

The paper itself says the frequency they use is 27.12 MHz which has a wavelength of 11 meters and is commonly used in toy radio telephones and RC cars, and apparently it is used to induce heat into the human body for muscle relaxation therapy, basically operating the same as a microwave oven at a lower frequency so it wouldn't just burn the skin off.

The reason for that particular frequency is that it's license free. How convenient that it just so happens to cure cancer as well?

Jun 01, 2019
Apparently the magic is in the modulation, which has specific frequencies in the audio range (500-22 kHz) that affect the cancer cells when they sweep the frequencies in a pattern.

So, if you play Bach into your kid's baby monitor and stick the antenna in your mouth for three hours a day, you might just cure your leukemia?

Sounds so incredible that I'm going to pass it off to the X files.

Jun 02, 2019
Eikka: Thanks for helping to clarify. Your example using IR is not exactly analogous, though, as that is relatively longwave visible spectrum radiation. Cell phones emit at much higher frequencies, creating different resonances, and though the energies may be very low classically speaking, quantum chemistry is not so well understood that it can predict the outcomes of interactions of quanta resonating in say the brain. Robert O. Becker experimentally showed that small changes in cell voltage have a major effect on cell function, or lack of it.

That said, you are probably right about it's being a hoax. I'll be keeping an eye on RetractionWatch.

Jun 02, 2019
quantum chemistry is not so well understood that it can predict the outcomes of interactions of quanta resonating in say the brain
Anonym

it isn't well understood by you. How do you know it isn't well enough understood by some quantum physicists so they can predict whether it could have a possible significant biological effect?

Jun 02, 2019
At first, when I read this above article, I was very skeptical of their claim that radio waves alone could be effectively used to treat cancer as radio waves, unlike X-rays, have no significant ionizing effect so I found it difficult to believe this would work.
But, I think this is very unlikely to be a hoax because, if you read it carefully, they say the have "shown" it to work and they describe a specific experiment for it that can be readily replicated in other labs to check the validly of the claimed results and therefore if it was a hoax then that hoax would soon be easily blown and then they would be done for scientific fraud and disgraced and punished accordingly and they would surely know it and I think they surely wouldn't be that STUPID as to try an pull off such a flimsy hoax!


Jun 02, 2019
-continued-

They also explained an apparently plausible biological mechanism of how this radio-wave therapy could actually work, which further increases my confidence that this is no hoax.

I hope this would lead to cures for many types of cancers. But will it?

Jun 02, 2019
Your example using IR is not exactly analogous, though, as that is relatively longwave visible spectrum radiation. Cell phones emit at much higher frequencies


IR is much higher frequency than microwaves and cellphones.

This device works at 27 MHz which is in the long wave spectrum. It's CB radio: walkie talkies, HAM radio etc. Cellphones work between 700 - 2000 MHz. Wi-fi works between 2000 - 5000 MHz. IR is between 300 GHz up to 385 THz although the lower end of the IR spectrum is now called Terahertz radiation.

All of these are the same kind of EM radiation, so it's rather hard to believe that milliwatt-levels of citizen band frequencies could do anything to your cells, considering that your body is awash with cosmic radio signals of the same frequencies. That's why milliwatt radio transmitters have a hard time transmitting over any distance: the signal gets lost in the background noise after about 10 meters.


Jun 02, 2019
The difficulty in believing that a 11 meter radio wave can have any effect on cells or molecules comes from the fact that the molecule should act as an antenna in resonance with the signal. This occurs when the antenna is some even division of the wavelength, such as 1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8... etc. of the wave, but as you make the antenna shorter, the amount of energy transferred from the wave to the antenna diminishes as well.

Cells are so small that the difference between 11 meters and something on the scale of micrometers or nanometers effectively cannot couple any energy from the radio wave. When you're starting with transmitter that gives out milliwatts - as their device does - the extremely low coupling means that the molecules get pico or femtowatts, or even smaller amounts of power and it's physically implausible to gain enough energy for anything to happen.

And, it's not the radio frequency itself but the modulation, which they claim for effect.

Jun 02, 2019
And, with the modulation being blamed for the effect, the story becomes even more implausible: the modulation happens at audio frequencies which have a wavelength a million times longer, so it's even more implausible that -any- energy transfer is occurring between the signal and the cells.

This is true for EM waves; as pressure waves in air or liquids the wavelength is different, but then you'd have to claim that you can literally play audible music into your mouth to cure cancer.

You can think of the situation like boats bobbing on ocean waves. If you have a 11 meter wave, and an 11 meter boat, the waves twist and spin the boat. If you have an 11 meter boat (the cell) and a wave that is as long as the Pacific ocean (the CB radio signal), you're not going to notice any difference. The ocean just seems to rise and fall very gradually by a very small amount.

Jun 02, 2019
and though the energies may be very low classically speaking, quantum chemistry is not so well understood that it can predict the outcomes of interactions of quanta resonating in say the brain.


QM also says that while these interactions are theoretically possible, the probability of absorbing a single quantum of energy across such a vast difference in fundamental frequencies is so improbable that it would take the life of the universe to happen.

It's "true" in the same sense that there is a probability to kick a soccer ball clean through a brick wall without harming the ball or the wall, but nobody will ever see it happen.

Jun 02, 2019
if you read it carefully, they say the have "shown" it to work and they describe a specific experiment for it that can be readily replicated in other labs to check the validly of the claimed results and therefore if it was a hoax then that hoax would soon be easily blown and then they would be done for scientific fraud and disgraced and punished accordingly and they would surely know it and I think they surely wouldn't be that STUPID as to try an pull off such a flimsy hoax!


It's probably based on weak evidence, and someone replicating it would need to run a larger clinical trial to disprove their findings - and with research sponsors and scientists being averse to running experiments that are likely to return a null result, we'll probably have to wait a long time before anyone cares to pick it up and blow a hole in their study.

In the mean while, they'll probably spin it into a line of radio-frequency spoons sold to the public health care system at a great price.

Jun 03, 2019
@humy:

You missed my point, which was that quantum chemistry might explain this otherwise classically inexplicable result. (Although my authority on QC has been dead for several decades now, I think it's still correct to say that quantum chemistry is not well understood. ... Becker found that very small changes in voltage had major effects on cell function.)

@Eikka:

Thanks again for further clarification.


Jun 04, 2019
Becker found that very small changes in voltage had major effects on cell function.


Depends on what is "very small". We are awash in voltage fields. The voltage difference between your head and your toes can easily be hundreds or thousands of volts simply from atmospheric charges, and you won't even feel it - except sometimes when you step out of your car and touch the door frame, and it gives you a snap.


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