Medical research

Researchers create heart cells from stem cells using 3-D printing

All humans start out from a single cell which then divides to eventually form the embryo. Depending on the signals sent by their adjacent cells, these divided cells are then developed or differentiated into specific tissues ...

Oncology & Cancer

Immunotherapy-resistant cancers eliminated in mouse study

Immunotherapy has revolutionized cancer treatment by stimulating the patient's own immune system to attack cancer cells, yielding remarkably quick and complete remission in some cases. But such drugs work for less than a ...

Vaccination

New Russian virus vaccine one among many

With Russia's announcement Tuesday that it had become the first country to approve a vaccine against COVID-19, here is a look at the more than two dozen other candidates currently in development.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Coronavirus-related children's diseases linked to blood cell changes

A newly described disease occurring in children and linked to COVID-19 has significant changes in white blood cells—a discovery that may allow doctors to better assess their young patients' condition and predict their resistance ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Kids with 'silent malaria infection' at risk of cancer

A study has found strong similarities between children withendemic Burkitt lymphoma—an aggressive cancer that attacks the body's defense system and children with silent malaria infection.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Malaria discovery could expedite antiviral treatment for COVID-19

The study, conducted by an international team and led by RMIT University's Professor Christian Doerig, outlines a strategy that could save years of drug discovery research and millions of dollars in drug development by repurposing ...

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Cell (biology)

The cell is the structural and functional unit of all known living organisms. It is the smallest unit of an organism that is classified as living, and is often called the building block of life. Some organisms, such as most bacteria, are unicellular (consist of a single cell). Other organisms, such as humans, are multicellular. (Humans have an estimated 100 trillion or 1014 cells; a typical cell size is 10 µm; a typical cell mass is 1 nanogram.) The largest known cell is an unfertilized ostrich egg cell.

In 1835 before the final cell theory was developed, a Czech Jan Evangelista Purkyně observed small "granules" while looking at the plant tissue through a microscope. The cell theory, first developed in 1839 by Matthias Jakob Schleiden and Theodor Schwann, states that all organisms are composed of one or more cells. All cells come from preexisting cells. Vital functions of an organism occur within cells, and all cells contain the hereditary information necessary for regulating cell functions and for transmitting information to the next generation of cells.

The word cell comes from the Latin cellula, meaning, a small room. The descriptive name for the smallest living biological structure was chosen by Robert Hooke in a book he published in 1665 when he compared the cork cells he saw through his microscope to the small rooms monks lived in.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA