Link between periodontitis and cardiovascular disease in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis

Rates of both periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease are elevated in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis. New research published in Arthritis & Rheumatology suggests that immune responses to certain bacteria that cause periodontal disease may play a role in patients' higher cardiovascular disease risk.

Among 197 patients with , those with antibody responses to common periodontal pathogens were more likely to also show signs of atherosclerosis.

"Evidence of exposure to a particular periodontal pathogen called Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans had the strongest associations with atherosclerosis in the patients with rheumatoid arthritis that we studied," said lead author Jon T. Giles, MD MPH, of Columbia University. "Moreover, it was associated with measures of coronary, carotid, and peripheral atherosclerosis, over and above other risk factors for atherosclerosis. Further studies are needed to determine if eliminating exposure to this pathogen might modify the increase in known to be part of rheumatoid arthritis."


Explore further

Rheumatoid arthritis linked to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes

More information: Jon T Giles et al, Associations of Antibodies Targeting Periodontal Pathogens with Subclinical Coronary, Carotid, and Peripheral Arterial Atherosclerosis in Rheumatoid Arthritis, Arthritis & Rheumatology (2020). DOI: 10.1002/art.41572
Provided by Wiley
Citation: Link between periodontitis and cardiovascular disease in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (2020, November 18) retrieved 5 December 2020 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-11-link-periodontitis-cardiovascular-disease-individuals.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
4 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments