Study links high lipid levels in early pregnancy with congenital heart disease in children

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In a study in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, pregnant women with elevated blood levels of certain lipids—in particular, triglyceride, Apolipoprotein-A1, and Apolipoprotein-B levels—during the first trimester were more than twice as likely to deliver children with congenital heart disease.

The study included 230 women of mothers who had children with congenital heart disease and 381 who had children without heart disease.

The authors noted that their findings re-iterate the importance of maintaining good health during pregnancy. "Also, investigating the link between maternal lipid profile with risk may aid in developing intervention strategies," said senior author Yong-Hao Gui, MD, MSc, of Children's Hospital of Fudan University, in China.


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More information: Li Cao et al, High maternal blood lipid levels during early pregnancy are associated with increased risk of congenital heart disease in offspring, Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica (2021). DOI: 10.1111/aogs.14225
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Citation: Study links high lipid levels in early pregnancy with congenital heart disease in children (2021, August 4) retrieved 25 September 2021 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-08-links-high-lipid-early-pregnancy.html
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