This article has been reviewed according to Science X's editorial process and policies. Editors have highlighted the following attributes while ensuring the content's credibility:

fact-checked

peer-reviewed publication

proofread

Bioprinting methods for fabricating in vitro tubular blood vessel models

Bioprinting methods for fabricating in vitro tubular blood vessel models
Freestanding, perfusable, and functional in vitro vascular models developed using coaxial nozzle cell printing for mimicking native endothelium pathophysiology. Credit: Dong-Woo Cho, Pohang University of Science and Technology

A review paper by scientists at the Chonnam National University summarized the recent research on bioprinting methods for fabricating bioengineered blood vessel models. The new review paper, published in the journal Cyborg and Bionic Systems, provided an overview on the 3D bioprinting methods for fabricating bioengineered blood vessel models and described possible advancements from tubular to vascular models.

"3D technology provides a more precise and effective means for investigating and developing new treatments than traditional 2D cell cultures. Therefore, it is a crucial tool in the field of regenerative medicine and ," explained study author Hee-Gyeong Yi, a professor at the Chonnam National University.

Two-dimensional (2D) blood vessel models have difficulties in mimicking the three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment in human, simulating kinetics related to cell activities, and replicating human pathophysiology.

"In vitro bioengineered models created through biofabrication based on and regenerative medicine are breakthrough models that can overcome limitations of 2D and animal models," said study authors. Thus, they reviewed the 3D bioprinting methods for fabricating bioengineered blood vessel models and described possible advancements from tubular to vascular models.

Bioengineered models (BMs) are innovative models that can overcome limitations of 2D and animal models to allow simulation of the natural microenvironment in the human body in a patient- and target-specific manner. "BMs can be used to verify the safety and efficacy of drugs and by recreating structures and functions that maximally resemble those of tissues and organs in vitro," said Yi.

The study authors discussed recent 3D bioprinting methods for fabricating bioengineered blood vessel models. Coaxial nozzle bioprinting, for example, is a 3D bioprinting technique used to fabricate structures of concentric shapes via simultaneous printing of bioink of two different materials.

Bioprinting can be used to fabricate with complex, micro-scale structures in vitro for the construction of in vitro models featuring multiple connected tissues. Moreover, fabrication of vascularized tissues that closely resemble anatomical tissues will allow a detailed in vitro examination of diseases related to blood vessels and further large-scale fabrication of diverse, large-caliber tissues.

Recent rapid advancement of techniques to fabricate in vitro models is expected to overcome current limitations, paving the way for more accurate drug evaluation and efficacy analyses of blood vessels and blood flow dynamics in the body.

"Advancements in scaffold fabrication techniques, such as electrospinning or 3D scaffolding approaches, and fine-tuning printing parameters based on the specific requirements of tubular structures and complex tissue models can contribute to the creation of more intricate and tailored structures," said Yi.

The review paper calls for researchers, , engineers, and other experts to collaboratively marshal the research on 3D bioprinting methods for fabricating bioengineered vessel models into practical applications that study human physiology and diseases in a more relevant and accurate manner.

More information: Seon-Jin Kim et al, Bioprinting Methods for Fabricating In Vitro Tubular Blood Vessel Models, Cyborg and Bionic Systems (2023). DOI: 10.34133/cbsystems.0043

Journal information: Cyborg and Bionic Systems
Provided by Beijing Institute of Technology Press Co., Ltd
Citation: Bioprinting methods for fabricating in vitro tubular blood vessel models (2023, September 7) retrieved 16 July 2024 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2023-09-bioprinting-methods-fabricating-vitro-tubular.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

Explore further

Bioprinting technology combined with artificial intelligence allows high quality in vitro models

1 shares

Feedback to editors