Medical research

Can magnetic stem cells improve cartilage repair?

Cells equipped with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) can be directed to a specific location by an external magnetic field, which is beneficial for tissue repair. Researchers have now taken the important ...

Medical research

Stem cells and more: How dentists of the future may fix your teeth

The next time you lose a tooth, could your dentist just grow you a new one? Not yet, but research at USC brings dentists a step closer. Here are a few ways Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC scientists could revolutionize ...

Medical research

The role of family doctors in advanced therapies

A recent study conducted jointly by the Tissue Engineering Research Group of the Department of Histology and the family medicine Unit of the University of Granada (UGR) has highlighted the conceptual, attitudinal and procedural ...

Medical research

A revolution in regenerative medicine

Every year in the United States, hundreds of thousands of people learn that the pain in their knee or shoulder is a soft tissue that needs repair or replacement.

Medical research

A new way of diagnosing and treating disease—without cutting skin

University of British Columbia researchers have developed a specialized microscope that has the potential ability to both diagnose diseases that include skin cancer and perform incredibly precise surgery—all without cutting ...

Oncology & Cancer

Risk of metastatic cancer increases in those who have diabetes

As if people living with diabetes didn't have enough health concerns, here's another: increased risk of metastatic cancer. New Cornell University research points to a possible explanation for this health double whammy.

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Tissue engineering

Tissue engineering was once categorised as a subfield of Biomaterials, but having grown in scope and importance it can be considered as a field in its own right. It is the use of a combination of cells, engineering and materials methods, and suitable biochemical and physio-chemical factors to improve or replace biological functions. While most definitions of tissue engineering cover a broad range of applications, in practice the term is closely associated with applications that repair or replace portions of or whole tissues (i.e., bone, cartilage, blood vessels, bladder, etc.). Often, the tissues involved require certain mechanical and structural properties for proper functioning. The term has also been applied to efforts to perform specific biochemical functions using cells within an artificially-created support system (e.g. an artificial pancreas, or a bioartificial liver). The term regenerative medicine is often used synonymously with tissue engineering, although those involved in regenerative medicine place more emphasis on the use of stem cells to produce tissues.

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