Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

New vaccine for malaria could be more effective

Researchers at the Institute for Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago have developed an innovative new system for delivering a malaria vaccine that shows promise in its effectiveness. By developing a vaccine ...

Medical research

New material could improve bone grafting

For complex injuries and other situations requiring bone grafts, the best available technique involves autologous bone harvesting and re-implantation at the site of regrowth. However, because this process is invasive and ...

Medical research

Multichannel bioreactor for lung regeneration analysis

New strides are being made toward the ex vivo growth of human lungs. In a new article published in Tissue Engineering, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, researchers report the development of ...

Medical research

Successful bladder repair using silk fibroid scaffolds

A team of researchers developed a novel model of partial bladder outlet obstruction (pBOO) in female swine and used this model to show that even after inducing severe urinary outlet resistance and damage to the bladder, they ...

Cancer

Tissue stiffness is a "mosh pit" where cancer cells thrive

Imagine being at a packed concert hall with a mosh pit full of dancers creating a wall against outsiders. When targeted drugs try to make their way toward a pancreas tumor, they encounter a similar obstacle in stiff tissue ...

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Tissue engineering

Tissue engineering was once categorised as a subfield of Biomaterials, but having grown in scope and importance it can be considered as a field in its own right. It is the use of a combination of cells, engineering and materials methods, and suitable biochemical and physio-chemical factors to improve or replace biological functions. While most definitions of tissue engineering cover a broad range of applications, in practice the term is closely associated with applications that repair or replace portions of or whole tissues (i.e., bone, cartilage, blood vessels, bladder, etc.). Often, the tissues involved require certain mechanical and structural properties for proper functioning. The term has also been applied to efforts to perform specific biochemical functions using cells within an artificially-created support system (e.g. an artificial pancreas, or a bioartificial liver). The term regenerative medicine is often used synonymously with tissue engineering, although those involved in regenerative medicine place more emphasis on the use of stem cells to produce tissues.

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