Obstetrics & gynaecology

Trophoblast motility in a gelatin hydrogel

Trophoblast cells, which surround the developing blastocyst in early pregnancy, play an important role in implantation in the uterine wall. A new multidimensional model of trophoblast motility that utilizes a functionalized ...

Medical research

What do breast cancer cells feel inside the tumour?

Using a new technique, a team of McGill University researchers has found tiny and previously undetectable 'hot spots' of extremely high stiffness inside aggressive and invasive breast cancer tumors. Their findings suggest, ...

Genetics

Cell-free DNA provides a dynamic window into health

Short fragments of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) that circulate in blood, urine, and other biofluids can offer an information-rich window into human physiology and disease. By looking at the methylation markers of cfDNA, researchers ...

Oncology & Cancer

Cancer cells take over blood vessels to spread

In laboratory studies, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University researchers observed a key step in how cancer cells may spread from a primary tumor to a distant site within the body, a process known ...

Medical research

Scientists develop a new way to deliver drugs through the skin

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) have shown that applying 'temporal pressure' to the skin of mice can create a new way ...

Medical research

Directly printing 3-D tissues within the body

In the TV series Westworld, human body parts are built on robotic frames using 3-D printers. While still far from this scenario, 3-D printers are being increasingly used in medicine. For example, 3-D printing can be used ...

Medical research

COVID-19 and the role of tissue engineering

Tissue engineering has a unique set of tools and technologies for developing preventive strategies, diagnostics, and treatments that can play an important role during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Three key areas pioneered ...

Medical research

Biofabrication drives tissue engineering in 2019

In the quest to engineer replacement tissues and organs for improving human health, biofabrication has emerged as a crucial set of technologies that enable the control of precise architecture and organization. A new article ...

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Tissue engineering

Tissue engineering was once categorised as a subfield of Biomaterials, but having grown in scope and importance it can be considered as a field in its own right. It is the use of a combination of cells, engineering and materials methods, and suitable biochemical and physio-chemical factors to improve or replace biological functions. While most definitions of tissue engineering cover a broad range of applications, in practice the term is closely associated with applications that repair or replace portions of or whole tissues (i.e., bone, cartilage, blood vessels, bladder, etc.). Often, the tissues involved require certain mechanical and structural properties for proper functioning. The term has also been applied to efforts to perform specific biochemical functions using cells within an artificially-created support system (e.g. an artificial pancreas, or a bioartificial liver). The term regenerative medicine is often used synonymously with tissue engineering, although those involved in regenerative medicine place more emphasis on the use of stem cells to produce tissues.

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