Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, (CSHL) traces its roots to 1890. It is presently located in Suffolk County, Long Island, New York. The private, not for profit lab scientists from the Carnegie Institution of Department of Genetics have made significant contributions in the study and treatment of genetics and medicine. Recently, The Watson School of Biological Sciences was established which employs 400 scientists. CSHL has an educational and research component. CSHL has eight Nobel Laureates who have been associated with the lab. Many break-through discoveries have been made at CSHL. Among the discoveries is the work by John D. Watson who co-discovered the double helix structure of DNA with Francis Crick. Robert J. Roberts received the Nobel Prize for the co-discovery of introns and RNA splicing. CSHL requires all inquiries from the media and public go through Mr. Tarr, e-mail provided.

Address
One Bungtown Road Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724 516-367-8800
Website
http://www.cshl.edu/index.html
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cold_Spring_Harbor_Laboratory

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Oncology & Cancer

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Things aren't always as they seem. Take pancreatic cancer, for example. In up to one in 10 cases, researchers have documented a peculiar characteristic. Some of the pancreatic cells appear to have lost their identity. It's ...

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Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Associate Professor and Cancer Center member Tobias Janowitz led a COVID-19 clinical trial with Northwell Health in 2021. When he and Clinical Fellow Hassal Lee reviewed the data, a surprising ...

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Neuroscience

How a mouse's brain bends time

Life has a challenging tempo. Sometimes, it moves faster or slower than we'd like. Nevertheless, we adapt. We pick up the rhythm of conversations. We keep pace with the crowd walking a city sidewalk.

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