Entomological Society of America

The Entomological Society of America (ESA) has been in existence since 1889. ESA is a non-profit organization committed to serving its 5700 etymologist members and individual members in etymology-related fields. ESA has member representatives from governmental agencies, educational institutions and professional associations who work in disciplines related to the study of insects. ESA publishes reports and research abstracts involving etymology and publishes The Annals of the Entomological Society of America, Environmental Entomology, Journal of Economic Entomology and Journal of Medical Entomology. The headquarters is in Lanham, Maryland with offices around the nation. ESA welcomes press and media inquiries.

Address
10001 Derekwood Lane, Suite 100, Lanham, MD 20706-4876
Website
http://www.entsoc.org/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entomological_Society_of_America

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Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Potential range for new invasive tick covers much of eastern US

Since the arrival of the Asian longhorned tick in North America was first reported in New Jersey in early 2018, it has been found in eight other states in the U.S. And, by the looks of a new study comparing North American ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

The case for greater focus on mosquitoes, ticks in epidemiology

The textbook approach to managing disease outbreaks focuses on three factors—pathogen, host, and environment—but it leaves out one critical component in the case of afflictions such as Zika, malaria, and Lyme: the insect ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Study sheds light on new Lyme disease-causing bacteria

A new species of bacteria that causes Lyme disease needs the same amount of time for transmission after a tick bite compared to previously implicated bacteria, according to new research by the Centers for Disease Control ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Traces of Zika Found in Asian tiger mosquito in Brazil

In a recent test of Asian tiger mosquitoes collected in Brazil, researchers found fragments of Zika virus RNA, raising concerns that it may be carried by species other than Zika's known primary vector, the yellow fever mosquito.

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