Garvan Institute of Medical Research

The Garvan Institute of Medical Research was founded in 1963 by the Sisters of Charity. Initially a research department of St Vincent's Hospital in Sydney, it is now one of Australia's largest medical research institutions with approximately 500 scientists, students and support staff. Funds for its establishment were provided by a hospital appeal. Helen Mills, the largest donor, asked for the centre to be named after her father, the late James Patrick Garvan (1843-1896), a distinguished New South Wales parliamentarian and business leader. Garvan's research programs are based around the major diseases in today's society: cancer, diabetes, osteoporosis, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's; as well as eating disorders, and autoimmune and inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and asthma. It specialises in genetic and molecular technologies, and emphasises collaborative research. The current director is John Mattick.

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Tumor-trained T cells go on patrol

'Tumour-trained' immune cells - which have the potential to kill cancer cells - have been seen moving from one tumour to another for the first time. The new findings, which were uncovered by scientists at Australia's Garvan ...

May 15, 2017
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A one-two punch hits pancreatic cancer where it hurts

Australian scientists have uncovered a promising new approach to treating pancreatic cancer, by targeting the tissue around the tumour to make it 'softer' and more responsive to chemotherapy. The findings are published today ...

Apr 05, 2017
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