Neuroscience Research Australia

Neuroscience Research Australia (also known as NeuRA) is an independent medical research institute based in Sydney, Australia. Previously called the Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute, the institute relaunched as Neuroscience Research Australia on 1 June 2010., NeuRA is accredited by the National Health and Medical Research Council. Neuroscience Research Australia is made up of approximately 260 researchers specialising in research on the brain and nervous system in health and disease.

Website
http://www.neura.edu.au/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neuroscience_Research_Australia

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

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Parkinson's & Movement disorders

Early intervention may be possible for Parkinson's disease

One of the largest post-mortem brain studies in the world has confirmed that a protein (LRRK2) associated with the development of Parkinson's disease is increased in the pre-symptom stages, leading researchers to believe ...

Sleep apnea

Not all sleep apnea patients are obese

Contrary to popular opinion, not all people who suffer from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are obese. However, a new study from Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA) and the Prince of Wales Hospital (POWH) highlights that ...

Neuroscience

Falls assessment in older Aussies takes a step forward

Fall risk assessment in older adults has taken a step forward thanks to a new measure that can more accurately assess underlying physical and neurocognitive disturbances that may predict future falls

Neuroscience

New hope for improved recovery after stroke

Researchers with Neuroscience Research Australia and their colleagues have identified a remarkable new of improving recovery after stroke. The team found that some stroke patients have a distorted or "scrambled" representation ...

Neuroscience

Don't let botox go to your head…or should you?

Injecting botox into the arm muscles of stroke survivors, with severe spasticity, changes electrical activity in the brain and may assist with longer-term recovery, according to new research.

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Re-learning words lost to dementia

A simple word-training program has been found to restore key words in people with a type of dementia that attacks language and our memory for words.

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