Radboud University Nijmegen

Neuroscience

How the brain builds on prior knowledge

It is easier to learn something new if you can link it to something you already know. A specific part of the brain appears to be involved in this process: the medial prefrontal cortex. The Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience ...

Immunology

Modulating your own immune response

With the help of simple techniques like breathing exercises, meditation and repeated exposure to cold, you can activate the autonomic nervous system and inhibit the response of your immune system. Researchers from the Radboud ...

Neuroscience

Conceptual representation in the brain: Towards mind-reading

Your measured brain signals can reveal whether you are thinking about an animal or a tool. That's what neuroscientist Irina Simanova discovered during her PhD at Radboud University, where she investigated the conceptual representation ...

Neuroscience

Neuroscientists disprove idea about brain-eye coordination

By predicting our eye movements, our brain creates a stable world for us. Researchers used to think that those predictions had so much influence that they could cause us to make errors in estimating the position of objects. ...

Neuroscience

New research on the neural details of 'swiping'

While observing fellow train passengers eagerly swiping their touch screens, neuroscientist Sara Fabbri got the idea to explore the neurocomputational basis of the swiping, tapping and pinching movements that people make ...

Neuroscience

Learning how to listen with neurofeedback

When listening to music or learning a new language, auditory perceptual learning occurs: a process in which your recognition of specific sounds improves, making you more efficient in processing and interpreting them. Neuroscientist ...

Neuroscience

Brain structure shows affinity with numbers

The structure of the brain shows the way in which we process numbers. People either do this spatially or non-spatially. A study by Florian Krause from the Donders Institute in Nijmegen shows for the first time that these ...

Neuroscience

Study finds neural differences in good navigators

The brains of people who immediately know their way after travelling along as a passenger are different from the brains of people who always need a GPS system or a map to get from one place to another. This was demonstrated ...

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