Rice University

Rice University is the common name for William Marsh Rice Institute for the Advancement of Letters, Science and Art. It was established in 1891 and opened in 1912 in Houston, Texas. Rice University has approximately 5200 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral students. Rice University is noted for its applied science programs including Nanotechnology, artificial heart research, structural chemical analysis and space science. The Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology was renamed for Nobel Prize winner, Richard E. Smalley a Rice professor. Later the Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology was created. Rice University welcomes public and press inquiries.

Address
402C Lovett Hall, MS-300 Houston, Texas 77005-2659
Website
http://www.rice.edu/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rice_University

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Medical economics

When physicians integrate with hospitals, costs go up, study says

When physicians integrate with hospitals, the cost of health care rises even though there's no evidence patients get better treatment, according to a new paper by experts at Rice University and Blue Cross and Blue Shield ...

Oncology & Cancer

Quest for new cancer treatment crosses milestone

A cancer therapy invented at Rice University has crossed a milestone in clinical trials, a major development in a decadeslong quest to develop a treatment that destroys tumors without the debilitating side effects of chemotherapy, ...

Cardiology

Damaged hearts rewired with nanotube fibers

Thin, flexible fibers made of carbon nanotubes have now proven able to bridge damaged heart tissues and deliver the electrical signals needed to keep those hearts beating.

Medications

In search of clues to fight antibiotic resistance

To combat the rise of drug-resistant bacteria, researchers are examining how one superbug adapts to fight an antibiotic of last resort, hoping to find clues that can prolong the drug's effectiveness.

Medical research

New genetic weapons challenge sickle cell disease

Help for patients with sickle cell disease may soon come from gene editing to fix the mutation that causes the disease and boost the patient's own protective fetal hemoglobin.

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