University of Strathclyde, Glasgow

The University of Strathclyde (Scottish Gaelic: Oilthigh Srath Chluaidh), Glasgow, Scotland, is Glasgow's second university by age, founded in 1796 by Professor John Anderson, and receiving its Royal Charter in 1964 as the UK's first technological university. It takes its name from the historic Kingdom of Strathclyde and is characterised today by leading research of international standing, with a reputation for excellence across research, education and knowledge exchange. The University of Strathclyde is Scotland's third largest university by number of students carrying an international reputation and outlook, with students and staff from over 100 countries. The university founded in 1796 through the will of Professor John Anderson, professor of Natural Philosophy at the University of Glasgow who left instructions and the majority of his estate to create a second university in Glasgow which would focus on "Useful Learning" – specialising in practical subjects – "for the good of mankind and the improvement of science, a place of useful learning". The University later named one of the two campuses after him.

Address
16 Richmond Street, Glasgow, Scotland, Scotland
Website
http://www.strath.ac.uk/

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