University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) is an institute of health science education and research, located in the South Texas Medical Center. UTHSCSA is the largest health sciences university in South Texas. Located in the South Texas Medical Center, it serves San Antonio and all of the 50,000 square miles (130,000 km) area of central and south Texas. It extends to campuses in the metropolitan border communities of Laredo and the Rio Grande Valley. With 24,000 graduates, more than 3,000 students a year train in an environment that involves more than 100 affiliated hospitals, clinics and health care facilities in South Texas. The university offers over 65 degrees, the majority of them being graduate and professional degrees, in the biomedical and health sciences fields. UTHSCSA is home to the Cancer Therapy & Research Center (CTRC) - a major National Cancer Institute supported Center. The CTRC's Institute for Drug Development (IDD) is internationally recognized for conducting the largest oncology Phase I clinical drug trials program in the world.

Address
7703 Floyd Curl Dr, San Antonio, Texas, United States of America 78229
Website
http://www.uthscsa.edu/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Texas_Health_Science_Center_at_San_Antonio

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Neuroscience

Team discovers novel root cause of tau-induced neurodegeneration

Researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UT Health San Antonio) today reported the discovery of a novel mechanism by which pathological forms of tau protein cause neurons to die. Alzheimer's ...

Overweight & Obesity

Boosting liver mRNAs curbs appetite, body weight in obese mice

Scientists from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UT Health San Antonio) today reported that inhibiting a liver enzyme in obese mice decreased the rodents' appetite, increased energy expenditure ...

Oncology & Cancer

Black patients with cancer fare worse with COVID-19, study shows

Black patients with cancer experienced significantly worse outcomes after COVID-19 diagnosis than non-Hispanic white cancer patients in a study published March 28 in JAMA Network Open. Investigators of the COVID-19 and Cancer ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Blood biomarker predicts dementia risk in Mexican Americans

Blood levels of a biomarker called glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) may uniquely aid prediction of dementia in Mexican Americans, researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UT Health ...

Neuroscience

Studies compare best ways to treat wide-neck aneurysms

Aneurysms are weak, bulging portions of blood vessel walls. These blood-filled sacs resemble balloons in structure and have necks like balloons. Some aneurysms have larger necks and are called "wide-neck" aneurysms. These ...

Neuroscience

In the quest for a TBI therapy, astrocytes may be the bull's-eye

Growing evidence suggests that traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important risk factor for developing Alzheimer's disease and dementia. But to date, effective therapies aren't available for preventing or treating TBI-induced ...

Oncology & Cancer

RNA 'heroes' can disarm bad-actor proteins in leukemia: study

Scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UT Health San Antonio) believe it may be possible to prevent DNA changes driven by two proteins highly active in leukemia and other cancers. They ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Immune memory less durable after severe COVID-19, study suggests

Infection-fighting B cells retain better memory of the coronavirus spike protein in University Hospital patients who recover from less-severe cases of COVID-19 than in those recovering from severe COVID-19, a new study suggests. ...

Neuroscience

Autism-linked gene, if deleted, results in less myelin

Myelin, a sheath of insulation around nerves that enables electrical impulses to efficiently travel through the central nervous system, is diminished in mice that have a gene deletion associated with autism spectrum disorder, ...

Neuroscience

Visuals increase attention; now science explains why

"Look at me!" we might say while attempting to engage our children. It turns out there is a neurochemical explanation for why looking at mom or dad actually helps kiddoes pay better attention.

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