University of Würzburg

Immunology

Blockade at the receptor

When chlamydia attacks the human body, the immune system activates. But the bacteria are adapted to defend themselves. Scientists from Würzburg have deciphered new details of their strategy.

Neuroscience

Supply bottleneck impairs nerve function

Impaired transport processes in neurons contribute to diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (AML). Würzburg scientists have now identified key actors in these processes.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

New insights into the world of trypanosomes

Single specimens of the vermicular pathogens causing sleeping sickness swim inside the gut of the tsetse fly between blood cells which the fly has ingested from an infected mammal. This is where they start their week-long ...

Medical research

Chewing gum rapid test for inflammation

Dental implants occasionally entail complications. Six to 15 percent of patients develop an inflammatory response in the years after receiving a dental implant. This is caused by bacteria destroying the soft tissue and the ...

Oncology & Cancer

Cancer detection with sugar molecules

Galectins are a family of proteins that have become a promising source of cancer research in recent years. A representative thereof is galectin-1. It sits on the surface of all human cells; on tumor cells, however, it occurs ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Motivation through punishment

The goal of punishment usually is to stop undesirable behaviour. But in fact, punishment may also have a facilitative to motivating effect, as researchers at the Institute of Psychology of the University of Würzburg have ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

Mental, social and inherited factors all play a role in anxiety disorders. In the journal Molecular Psychiatry, a research team from Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg (JMU) in Bavaria, Germany, describes a hitherto ...

Medical research

Osteoporosis: Antibody crystallized

Inhibiting a protein called Sclerostin could probably help treating the bone-loss disease osteoporosis. New findings at the University of Würzburg could stimulate this research.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Maternal language shapes infants' cry melodies

The very first cry of neonates is marked by their maternal language. This seems to be especially apparent in tonal languages, where pitch and pitch fluctuation determine the meaning of words. Chinese and German scientists ...

page 2 from 3