Oncology & Cancer

Leukemia vulnerability discovered causing drug sensitivity

All human tumors originating from various tissues share a series of properties that define them, including the ability to prevent cell death. Instead, healthy organs induce programmed cell death or apoptosis to balance their ...

Oncology & Cancer

Air pollution may increase risk for childhood leukemia

Exposure to traffic-related air pollution may be associated with an increased risk for childhood leukemia, according to a study published in the August issue of Environment International.

Oncology & Cancer

New effective combination therapy for pediatric T-acute leukemia

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer affecting children. The T-ALL form of leukemia that emerges from early T lineage cells has a poorer prognosis than B-lineage ALL. The prognosis for relapsed T-ALL ...

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Acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), is a form of leukemia, or cancer of the white blood cells characterized by excess lymphoblasts.

Malignant, immature white blood cells continuously multiply and are overproduced in the bone marrow. ALL causes damage and death by crowding out normal cells in the bone marrow, and by spreading (metastasizing) to other organs. ALL is most common in childhood with a peak incidence at 4–12 years of age, and another peak in old age. The overall cure rate in children is 85%, and about 50% of adults have long-term disease-free survival. 'Acute' refers to the undifferentiated, immature state of the circulating lymphocytes ("blasts"), and to the rapid progression of disease, which can be fatal in weeks to months if left untreated.

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