Cardiology

Why do women get statins less frequently than men?

Women are less likely than men to be treated with cholesterol-lowering statins—or get them prescribed at guideline-recommended intensity levels when they do, according to a new study that also looked at reasons behind the ...

Neuroscience

Cannabidiol reduces aggressiveness, study concludes

A new study has concluded that cannabidiol attenuates the aggressiveness induced by social isolation. The research, based on a mouse model, was performed by scientists at the University of São Paulo's Ribeirão Preto Medical ...

Oncology & Cancer

Noninvasive test improves detection of aggressive prostate cancer

A team of researchers from UCLA and the University of Toronto have identified a new biomarker found in urine that can help detect aggressive prostate cancer, potentially saving hundreds of thousands of men each year from ...

Oncology & Cancer

Prostate cancer urine test shows who needs treatment and when

Researchers at the University of East Anglia and the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital have developed a urine test to diagnose aggressive prostate cancer and predict whether patients will require treatment up to five ...

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Aggression

In psychology, as well as other social and behavioral sciences, aggression refers to behavior between members of the same species that is intended to cause pain or harm. Predatory or defensive behavior between members of different species is not normally considered "aggression." Aggression takes a variety of forms among humans and can be physical, mental, or verbal. Aggression should not be confused with assertiveness, although the terms are often used interchangeably among laypeople, e.g. an aggressive salesperson.

There are two broad categories of aggression. These include hostile, affective, or retaliatory aggression and instrumental, predatory, or goal-oriented aggression. Empirical research indicates that there is a critical difference between the two, both psychologically and physiologically. Some research indicates that people with tendencies toward affective aggression have lower IQs than those with tendencies toward predatory aggression. If only considering physical aggression, males tend to be more aggressive than females. One explanation for this difference is that females are physically weaker than men, and so need to resort to other means.

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