Pediatrics

A television in the bedroom?

Too much time in front of the bedroom TV deprives the child of more enriching developmental activities and may explain, in part, less optimal body mass, poor eating habits and socio-emotional difficulties as a teenager, says ...

Neuroscience

Sex and aggression in mice controlled by cold-sensor in brain

Testosterone is blamed for sex drive and aggression, but it also appears to be critical for telling the brain "enough!" when it comes to those behaviors. A molecule called TRPM8 (pronounced trip-M-8) embedded in the surface ...

Cancer

How prostate cancer becomes treatment resistant

The development of effective anti-androgen therapies for prostate cancer is a major scientific advance. However, some men who receive these targeted treatments are more likely to develop a deadly treatment-resistant prostate ...

Cancer

3-D-printed tumor model shows interaction with immune cells

Around a glioblastoma, a very aggressive brain tumor, cells of the human immune system help the tumor instead of attacking it. To explore the interaction of these cells, scientists of the University of Twente have created ...

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Aggression

In psychology, as well as other social and behavioral sciences, aggression refers to behavior between members of the same species that is intended to cause pain or harm. Predatory or defensive behavior between members of different species is not normally considered "aggression." Aggression takes a variety of forms among humans and can be physical, mental, or verbal. Aggression should not be confused with assertiveness, although the terms are often used interchangeably among laypeople, e.g. an aggressive salesperson.

There are two broad categories of aggression. These include hostile, affective, or retaliatory aggression and instrumental, predatory, or goal-oriented aggression. Empirical research indicates that there is a critical difference between the two, both psychologically and physiologically. Some research indicates that people with tendencies toward affective aggression have lower IQs than those with tendencies toward predatory aggression. If only considering physical aggression, males tend to be more aggressive than females. One explanation for this difference is that females are physically weaker than men, and so need to resort to other means.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA