Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Indoor precautions essential to stem airborne COVID-19

World-leading air quality and health expert QUT Professor Lidia Morawska and Professor Junji Cao from Chinese Academy of Sciences in an article in Environment International published this week called on health bodies to initiate ...

Health

Indoor air quality merits closer attention

A study covering all of French-speaking Switzerland found that energy-efficient renovation work on residential buildings tends to overlook the question of indoor air quality. The study's authors, mainly from EPFL and the ...

Pediatrics

Infant lungs and bushfire smoke

Everyone at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute extends their heartfelt sympathy and condolences to those affected by the devastating Australian bushfire situation, which unfortunately looks likely to continue in the ...

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Air Quality Index

The Air Quality Index (AQI) (also known as the Air Pollution Index (API) or Pollutant Standard Index (PSI)) is a number used by government agencies to characterize the quality of the air at a given location. As the AQI increases, an increasingly large percentage of the population is likely to experience increasingly severe adverse health effects. To compute the AQI requires an air pollutant concentration from a monitor or model. The function used to convert from air pollutant concentration to AQI varies by pollutant, and is different in different countries. Air quality index values are divided into ranges, and each range is assiged a descriptor and a color code. Standardized public health advisories are associated with each AQI range. An agency might also encourage members of the public to take public transportation or work from home when AQI levels are high.

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