Medical research

The benefits of exercise in a pill? Science is closer to that goal

Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine, Stanford School of Medicine and collaborating institutions report today in the journal Nature that they have identified a molecule in the blood that is produced during exercise and ...

Medications

Researchers upcycle pineapple leaves into low-cost fat trappers

Imagine swallowing a capsule or munching a cracker made from pineapple leaf fibers to lose weight at a fraction of the cost of fat burners currently available in the market. A multidisciplinary team of researchers from the ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

A new study relates liquid fructose intake to fatty liver disease

A high-fat diet is not enough to cause short-term fatty liver disease. However, if this diet is combined with the intake of beverages sweetened with liquid fructose, the accumulation of fats in the liver accelerates and hypertriglyceridemia ...

Endocrinology & Metabolism

Research finds higher disease protection in fat cells in females

Research from the University of Cincinnati finds a higher presence of mitochondria in fat tissue in females. The research suggests this provides women protection against obesity and metabolic diseases. The study was published ...

Cardiology

What should I eat to avoid heart disease?

Plant-based foods should dominate heart healthy diets, according to a paper published today in Cardiovascular Research, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). This comprehensive review of research on food ...

Health

Low-fiber, high-fat diets adversely impact the gut

Changes to the gut microbiome are known to affect metabolic health. Physiologists at Laval University in Canada have discovered that diets containing low fiber and high fat cause significant shifts in the composition of the ...

Gastroenterology

High-sugar diet can damage the gut, intensifying risk for colitis

Mice fed diets high in sugar developed worse colitis, a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and researchers examining their large intestines found more of the bacteria that can damage the gut's protective mucus layer.

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