Oncology & Cancer

Revealed: How cancer develops resistance to treatment

Cancer cells can turn on error-prone DNA copy pathways to adapt to cancer treatment, a breakthrough study published in the journal Science has revealed. Bacteria use the same process, termed stress-induced mutagenesis, to ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Using cognitive psychology to fight COVID-19 misconceptions

There's the idea that cloth masks don't protect people from the coronavirus, so there's no point in wearing them (hint: They do). That COVID-19 is just like the flu (it's not). That it only affects old people (also no).

Health

Video messages may help spread the word about antibiotic risks

Antibiotics are important drugs that can save lives, but using them too often can lead to dangerous strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. New Penn State research explores how to communicate risk while encouraging people ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

A potential new weapon in the war against superbugs

University of Melbourne researchers are finding ways to beat dangerous superbugs with 'resistance resistant' antibiotics, and it could help in our fight against coronavirus (COVID-19) complications.

Medical research

New testing system predicts septic shock outcomes

More than 1.7 million Americans develop sepsis each year, and more than 270,000 die from it. The condition—which happens when the body has an extreme response to a bacterial or viral infection, causing a chain reaction ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Hygiene reduces the need for antibiotics by up to 30%

According to a new Position Paper published in the American Journal of Infection Control (AJIC) online, improved everyday hygiene practices, such as hand-washing, reduces the risk of common infections by up to 50%, reducing ...

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Antibiotic resistance

Antibiotic resistance is the ability of a microorganism to withstand the effects of antibiotics. It is a specific type of drug resistance. Antibiotic resistance evolves via natural selection acting upon random mutation, but it can also be engineered by applying an evolutionary stress on a population. Once such a gene is generated, bacteria can then transfer the genetic information in a horizontal fashion (between individuals) by plasmid exchange. If a bacterium carries several resistance genes, it is called multiresistant or, informally, a superbug. The term antimicrobial resistance is sometimes used to explicitly encompass organisms other than bacteria.

Antibiotic resistance can also be introduced artificially into a microorganism through transformation protocols. This can aid in implanting artificial genes into the microorganism. If the resistance gene is linked with the gene to be implanted, the antibiotic can be used to kill off organisms that lack the new gene.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA