Biomedical technology

Researchers develop 3-D dressing to heal wounds

Researchers at ITMO University and the University of Toronto have developed a material based on gelatin and nanocrystalline cellulose that can fight off antibiotic-resistant bacteria and speed up the wound healing process. ...

Dentistry

Dental antibiotics up 25% during pandemic: study

The amount of antibiotics prescribed by dentists in Britain has soared by a quarter since COVID-19 struck, according to research published Friday highlighting the risk of a "slow-motion" pandemic of antibiotic resistance.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Could COVID-19 be fuelling drug resistance?

We need to understand the impact of COVID-19 on wider health issues to shape better public health responses and limit long-term consequences. Drug resistance is one of these, Gemma Buckland-Merrett explains.

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Antibiotic resistance

Antibiotic resistance is the ability of a microorganism to withstand the effects of antibiotics. It is a specific type of drug resistance. Antibiotic resistance evolves via natural selection acting upon random mutation, but it can also be engineered by applying an evolutionary stress on a population. Once such a gene is generated, bacteria can then transfer the genetic information in a horizontal fashion (between individuals) by plasmid exchange. If a bacterium carries several resistance genes, it is called multiresistant or, informally, a superbug. The term antimicrobial resistance is sometimes used to explicitly encompass organisms other than bacteria.

Antibiotic resistance can also be introduced artificially into a microorganism through transformation protocols. This can aid in implanting artificial genes into the microorganism. If the resistance gene is linked with the gene to be implanted, the antibiotic can be used to kill off organisms that lack the new gene.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA