Neuroscience

First evidence of immune response targeting brain cells in autism

Autism spectrum disorders affect one in 59 American children by age eight. With no known quantitative biological features, autism diagnoses are currently based on expert assessments of behavioral symptoms, including impaired ...

Medical research

Figuring out Alzheimer's

One of the tasks of scientists' work is to explain how the world functions. Their research ideas may often seem unrealistic but, as it turns out, their research may truly help a great many of us.

Neuroscience

Novel technique helps explain why bright light keeps us awake

In recent decades, scientists have learned a great deal about how different neurons connect and send signals to each other. But it's been difficult to trace the activity of individual nerve fibers known as axons, some of ...

Medical research

New window into brain cell communication debuts

The Allen Institute today released its first—and the world's largest—dataset of electrical brain activity gathered using Neuropixels, a new high-resolution silicon probe that can read out activity from hundreds of neurons ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Targeting immune cells may be potential therapy for Alzheimer's

Messy tangles of a protein called tau can be found in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease and some other neurodegenerative diseases. In Alzheimer's, the tangles coalesce just before tissue damage becomes visible ...

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Brain cell

Brain cell is a generic term for the neurons and glial cells. Neurons are nerve cells that process and transmit information through the nervous system. Glial cells provide support, protection, and nutrition to the neurons. Other cells in the brain include epithelial cells that make up the lining of the blood vessels.

Brain cells are commonly thought to remain in the beginning stage of interphase of cell reproduction for their life, and never divide, and instead develop by forming new synapses with other neurons. However, a landmark study in 1998 by researchers from Sweden and the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California, showed for the first time that some brain cells in mature humans may regenerate under certain circumstances.

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