Medical research

Scientists identify pathway to curb spread of brain cancer

UT Southwestern researchers have identified a molecular pathway responsible for the spread of glioblastoma to surrounding tissue in the brain, as well as an existing drug that curbed tumor growth in animal models. The findings, ...

Oncology & Cancer

Do wildfires put Californians at higher risk for lung cancer?

In California and across the country, more people are likely to die from lung cancer than any other cancer, the American Lung Association states in an August press release, as wildfire season is in full swing.

Oncology & Cancer

Brain tumor study highlights differences among Hispanics

Although typically classified as a single ethnic group, people of Hispanic heritage have markedly different risks for brain tumors based on their geographic origins, suggesting greater diversity that warrants attention in ...

Medical research

Glioblastoma cells invade the brain as neuronal free riders

Certain cells from glioblastomas, the most aggressive form of brain tumors, mimic characteristics and movement strategies of immature neurons to colonize the brain. Fundamental new results from researchers at Heidelberg University ...

Medications

Teaching an old drug new tricks

To treat some of the psychosis issues associated with Parkinson's disease, physicians often prescribe pimavanserin, an antipsychotic drug that acts within the brain to prevent hallucinations and delusions. Because of its ...

page 1 from 40

Brain tumor

A brain tumor is an abnormal growth of cells within the brain or inside the skull, which can be cancerous or non-cancerous (benign).

It is defined as any intracranial tumor created by abnormal and uncontrolled cell division, normally either in the brain itself (neurons, glial cells (astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells), lymphatic tissue, blood vessels), in the cranial nerves (myelin-producing Schwann cells), in the brain envelopes (meninges), skull, pituitary and pineal gland, or spread from cancers primarily located in other organs (metastatic tumors).

Primary (true) brain tumors are commonly located in the posterior cranial fossa in children and in the anterior two-thirds of the cerebral hemispheres in adults, although they can affect any part of the brain.

In the United States in the year 2005, it was estimated there were 43,800 new cases of brain tumors (Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States, Primary Brain Tumors in the United States, Statistical Report, 2005–2006), which accounted for 1.4 percent of all cancers, 2.4 percent of all cancer deaths, and 20–25 percent of pediatric cancers. Ultimately, it is estimated there are 13,000 deaths per year in the United States alone as a result of brain tumors.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA