Oncology & Cancer

Ultra-fine X-rays target brain cancer cells with precision

A new radiation therapy technique pioneered by scientists from the University of Wollongong's Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP) has shown promise for improving treatment outcomes in patients with brain cancer.

Medical research

Researchers destroy cancer cells with ultrasound treatment

An international research team led by Dr. Tali Ilovitsh of the Biomedical Engineering Department at Tel Aviv University developed a noninvasive technology platform for gene delivery into breast cancer cells. The technique ...

Oncology & Cancer

Team creates resource for pediatric brain tumor research

Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have created orthotopic patient-derived xenograft (O-PDX) models representing a variety of pediatric brain tumor types. The models are molecularly characterized and available ...

Oncology & Cancer

CICERO software enables detection of cancer-causing gene fusions

After years of development, engineering and enhancement, researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have made publicly available a software system that enables better detection of gene fusions. The system, called ...

Oncology & Cancer

Study charts the immune landscape of multiple brain cancers

A Ludwig Cancer Research study has profiled, in a sweeping comparative analysis, the distinct immune landscapes of tumors that arise in the brain, or gliomas, and those that metastasize to the organ from the lungs, breast ...

Oncology & Cancer

Mapping immune cells in brain tumors

The removal of a malignant brain tumor is something of a balancing act between removing as much tumor tissue as possible at the same time as protecting the healthy tissue. Since cancer cells infiltrate healthy brain tissue, ...

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Brain tumor

A brain tumor is an abnormal growth of cells within the brain or inside the skull, which can be cancerous or non-cancerous (benign).

It is defined as any intracranial tumor created by abnormal and uncontrolled cell division, normally either in the brain itself (neurons, glial cells (astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells), lymphatic tissue, blood vessels), in the cranial nerves (myelin-producing Schwann cells), in the brain envelopes (meninges), skull, pituitary and pineal gland, or spread from cancers primarily located in other organs (metastatic tumors).

Primary (true) brain tumors are commonly located in the posterior cranial fossa in children and in the anterior two-thirds of the cerebral hemispheres in adults, although they can affect any part of the brain.

In the United States in the year 2005, it was estimated there were 43,800 new cases of brain tumors (Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States, Primary Brain Tumors in the United States, Statistical Report, 2005–2006), which accounted for 1.4 percent of all cancers, 2.4 percent of all cancer deaths, and 20–25 percent of pediatric cancers. Ultimately, it is estimated there are 13,000 deaths per year in the United States alone as a result of brain tumors.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA