Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Pregnant and lactating women with COVID-19: Scant clinical research

Pregnant and breastfeeding women have been excluded from clinical trials of drugs to treat COVID-19, and as result, there is no safety data to inform clinical decisions. Such drugs include remdesivir according to a new article ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

COVID-19 and pregnancies: What we know

Amid the rapidly evolving global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic that has already had profound effects on public health and medical infrastructure across the globe, many questions remain about its impact on child ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Guidance issued for infants born to mothers with COVID-19

(HealthDay)—In an initial guidance document issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics, recommendations are presented for the management of infants born to mothers with suspected or confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

From dentists to playdates: Tips on social distancing and COVID-19

Millions of people across the country are hunkering down in their homes in response to social distancing mandates designed to reduce spread of the novel coronavirus. Federal and state authorities are advising people to avoid ...

Immunology

Breast milk may help prevent sepsis in preemies

A component of breast milk may help protect premature babies from developing sepsis, a fast-moving, life-threatening condition triggered by infection. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and ...

Medical research

Changing what heart cells eat could help them regenerate

Switching what the powerhouses of heart cells consume for energy could help the heart regenerate when cells die, a new study led by UT Southwestern researchers suggests. The finding, published in the Feb. 20, 2020, Nature ...

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Breast milk

Human Breast milk refers to the milk produced by a mother to feed her baby. It provides the primary source of nutrition for newborns before they are able to eat and digest other foods; older infants and toddlers may continue to be breastfed. The baby nursing from its own mother is the most ordinary way of obtaining breastmilk, but the milk can be pumped and then fed by baby bottle, cup and/or spoon, supplementation drip system, and nasogastric tube. Breastmilk can be supplied by a woman other than the baby's mother; either via donated pumped milk (for example from a milk bank), or when a woman nurses a child other than her own at her breast - this is known as wetnursing.

The World Health Organization recommends exclusive breastfeeding until six months of age, with solids gradually being introduced around this age when signs of readiness are shown. Breastfeeding is recommended for at least two years and should continue as long as mother and child wish. Breastfeeding continues to offer health benefits into and after toddlerhood. These benefits include; lowered risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), increased intelligence, decreased likelihood of contracting middle ear infections, cold, and flu bugs, decreased risk of some cancers such as childhood leukemia, lower risk of childhood onset diabetes, decreased risk of asthma and eczema, decreased dental problems, and decreased risk of obesity later in life, decreased risk of developing psychological disorders .

Breastfeeding also provides health benefits for the mother. It assist the uterus to return to its pre-pregnancy size and reduces post-partum bleeding as well as assisting the mother to return to her pre-pregnancy weight. Breastfeeding also reduces the risk of breast cancer later in life.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA