Diabetes

Gargling away the 'bad' bacteria in type 2 diabetes

There is growing evidence that ongoing inflammation in the mouth, such as that seen in gum disease, in addition to causing bad breath is associated with serious diseases such as Alzheimer's disease or type 2 diabetes. Now, ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Flu, COVID are spreading: Protect your heart say doctors

Flu and COVID are sweeping across the country, posing a particular hazard to people at risk for heart disease. These respiratory infections can trigger heart complications from fever, dehydration and inflammation, experts ...

Neuroscience

Breathing patterns during sleep found to impact memory processes

How are memories consolidated during sleep? In 2021, researchers led by Dr. Thomas Schreiner, leader of the Emmy Noether junior research group at LMU's Department of Psychology, had already shown there was a direct relationship ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

How slower breathing really helps against stress

People who are often stressed can feel calmer by making certain adjustments to their breathing. Possibly this also positively affects concentration and attention. Psychologist Roderik Gerritsen studied the effects of breathing ...

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Breathing

Breathing is the process that moves air in and out of the lungs. Aerobic organisms require oxygen to release energy via respiration, in the form of the metabolism of energy-rich molecules such as glucose. Breathing is only one process that delivers oxygen to where it is needed in the body and removes carbon dioxide. Another important process involves the movement of blood by the circulatory system. Gas exchange occurs in the pulmonary alveoli by passive diffusion of gases between the alveolar gas and the blood in lung capillaries. Once these dissolved gases are in the blood, the heart powers their flow around the body (via the circulatory system). The medical term for normal relaxed breathing is eupnea.

In addition to removing carbon dioxide, breathing results in loss of water from the body. Exhaled air has a relative humidity of 100% because of water diffusing across the moist surface of breathing passages and alveoli.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA