Cancer

HPV shame could put women off cervical cancer screening

The social stigmas and myths surrounding the human papilloma virus (HPV) could make women anxious, including raising fears about their partners' fidelity and putting them off going for cervical screening, according to research ...

Cancer

Study 'strongly supports' extending cervical screening intervals

Screening for high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection works well in practice and is more sensitive than cytology (smear) testing—offering greater protection against cervical cancer, confirm researchers in The ...

Cancer

USPSTF still recommends against pancreatic cancer screening

(HealthDay)—The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends against screening for pancreatic cancer in asymptomatic adults. These findings form the basis of a draft recommendation statement published online ...

Cancer

Novel cervical screening prgram: A woman's needs come first

A collaboration in Malaysia is piloting a novel cervical screening program that features the comfort of self-sampling and the ease of digital communication. Led by the University of Malaya in partnership with other universities, ...

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Cancer screening

Cancer screening occurs for many type of cancer including breast, prostate, lung, and colorectal cancer. Cancer screening is an attempt to detect unsuspected cancers in an asymptomatic population. Screening tests suitable for large numbers of healthy people must be relatively affordable, safe, noninvasive procedures with acceptably low rates of false positive results.[citation needed]If signs of cancer are detected, more definitive and invasive follow up tests are performed to confirm the diagnosis.

Screening for cancer can lead to earlier diagnosis in specific cases. Early diagnosis may lead to extended life, but may also falsely prolong the lead time to death through lead time bias or length time bias.[citation needed]

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