Oncology & Cancer

Making sense of mammography guidelines

Experts agree that detecting breast cancer early offers a better outlook, but when to start screenings and how often to have them has changed repeatedly.

Oncology & Cancer

More women in US receive 3-D mammography but disparities remain

Use of 3-D mammography, an advanced form of breast cancer screening, has risen rapidly in recent years, according to Yale researchers in a new study. But adoption of the technology varies widely, reflecting emerging disparities ...

Oncology & Cancer

Diagnostic yield of Lynch syndrome screening drops with age

(HealthDay)—The incremental diagnostic yield of Lynch syndrome (LS) screening decreases substantially after age 70 to 75 years, according to a study published online June 11 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Cancer screening

Cancer screening occurs for many type of cancer including breast, prostate, lung, and colorectal cancer. Cancer screening is an attempt to detect unsuspected cancers in an asymptomatic population. Screening tests suitable for large numbers of healthy people must be relatively affordable, safe, noninvasive procedures with acceptably low rates of false positive results.[citation needed]If signs of cancer are detected, more definitive and invasive follow up tests are performed to confirm the diagnosis.

Screening for cancer can lead to earlier diagnosis in specific cases. Early diagnosis may lead to extended life, but may also falsely prolong the lead time to death through lead time bias or length time bias.[citation needed]

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