Oncology & Cancer

Disasters can affect cervical cancer screening for years

Cervical cancer screening rates in Japan were significantly affected in the years following the devastating Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011, Tohoku University scientists report in the journal PLOS ONE.

Oncology & Cancer

Rural Hondurans embrace cancer screening opportunities

The burden of cancer is on the rise in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) such as Honduras. Few people in rural Honduras have access to cancer screening of any kind. A research team comprised of Honduran oncologists ...

Radiology & Imaging

Tomosynthesis outperforms digital mammography in five-year study

A new study published in the journal Radiology has found that the advantages of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) over digital mammography (DM), including increased cancer detection and fewer false positive findings, are ...

Radiology & Imaging

Low-dose chest CT leaves DNA intact

The low-dose chest CT scans used in lung cancer screening do not appear to damage human DNA, according to a study appearing in the journal Radiology. The results could help allay fears that such screenings will lead to an ...

Oncology & Cancer

Prevention and prognosis of cervical cancer

Jiayao Lei's thesis addresses research questions on prevention and prognosis of cervical cancer within the framework of the interplay of human papillomavirus (HPV), vaccination, and cervical screening, and also provides insights ...

Oncology & Cancer

The Golden State's mixed record on lung cancer

It was a bewildering moment for Zach Jump, the American Lung Association's national director of epidemiology and statistics. The numbers leaped off the computer screen and prompted an immediate question:

Oncology & Cancer

Cervical cancer elimination possible within two decades in the US

Scaling up cervical cancer screening coverage in the U.S. to 90% could expedite elimination of the disease and avert more than 1,000 additional cases per year, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. ...

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Cancer screening

Cancer screening occurs for many type of cancer including breast, prostate, lung, and colorectal cancer. Cancer screening is an attempt to detect unsuspected cancers in an asymptomatic population. Screening tests suitable for large numbers of healthy people must be relatively affordable, safe, noninvasive procedures with acceptably low rates of false positive results.[citation needed]If signs of cancer are detected, more definitive and invasive follow up tests are performed to confirm the diagnosis.

Screening for cancer can lead to earlier diagnosis in specific cases. Early diagnosis may lead to extended life, but may also falsely prolong the lead time to death through lead time bias or length time bias.[citation needed]

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