Neuroscience

Cannabinoids decrease the metabolism of glucose in the brain

The nervous system comprises neurons and glial cells (glia means 'glue'). Astrocytes are the most abundant among the glial cells. Among many other functions they undertake to capture glucose from the blood stream to provide ...

Medications

Cannabinoids may affect activity of other pharmaceuticals

Cannabinoid-containing products may alter the effects of some prescription drugs, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. They published information that could help medical professionals make safe prescribing ...

Addiction

Researchers flush out worrying trend of designer drug use

In a sign that designer drugs are becoming more prevalent in Australia, synthetic cathinones—commonly known as 'bath salts'—have been detected in the nation's wastewater in the largest study of its kind in the country.

Medications

Teen marijuana use boosts risk of adult insomnia

Smoke a lot of weed as a teenager, and when you reach adulthood you'll be more likely to have trouble falling or staying asleep, according to a new University of Colorado Boulder study of nearly 2,000 twins.

Medications

Using cannabinoids to treat acute pain

A new systematic review and meta-analysis showed a small but significant reduction in subjective pain scores for cannabinoid treatment compared to placebo in patients experiencing acute pain. No increase in serious adverse ...

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Cannabinoid

Cannabinoids are a class of chemical compounds which include the phytocannabinoids (oxygen-containing C21 aromatic hydrocarbon compounds found in the cannabis plant), and chemical compounds which mimic the actions of phytocannabinoids or have a similar structure (e.g. endocannabinoids, found in the nervous and immune systems of animals and that activate cannabinoid receptors). The most notable of the cannabinoids is ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)—the primary psychoactive compound of cannabis.

Synthetic cannabinoids encompass a variety of distinct chemical classes: the classical cannabinoids structurally related to THC, the nonclassical cannabinoids including the aminoalkylindoles, 1,5-diarylpyrazoles, quinolines and arylsulphonamides, as well as eicosanoids related to the endocannabinoids.

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