Oncology & Cancer

Cell division at high speed

In malignant tumours, the cells usually proliferate quickly and uncontrollably. A research team from the Biocenter of Julius-Maximilians-Universität (JMU) Würzburg in Bavaria, Germany, has discovered that two important ...

Medical research

Researchers spot mutations that crop up in normal cells as we age

Cell division is not perfect. As we get older, mutations often appear in genes in normal cells. Most of these mutated cells and their progeny—called "somatic clones"—have no effect on our health, but a tiny fraction can ...

Medical research

Study finds direct oxidative stress damage shortens telomeres

The same sources thought to inflict oxidative stress on cells—pollution, diesel exhaust, smoking and obesity—also are associated with shorter telomeres, the protective tips on the ends of the chromosomal shoelace.

Oncology & Cancer

Tumor cells' drug addiction may be their downfall

Blocking the processes that drive cancer cell growth is at the heart of many new anti-cancer therapies. Unfortunately, after initial success, cancer cells are generally able to develop workarounds to reactivate the pathways ...

Oncology & Cancer

New details revealed to explain how tumors recruit blood vessels

A study by University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers helps explain how tumors recruit blood vessels that provide fuel for their growth as well as an avenue for the tumors to spread.

page 1 from 23

Cell division

Cell division is a process by which a cell, called the parent cell, divides into two or more cells, called daughter cells. Cell division is usually a small segment of a larger cell cycle. This type of cell division in eukaryotes is known as mitosis, and leaves the daughter cell capable of dividing again. The corresponding sort of cell division in prokaryotes is known as binary fission. In another type of cell division present only in eukaryotes, called meiosis, a cell is permanently transformed into a gamete and cannot divide again until fertilization. For simple unicellular organisms such as the amoeba, one cell division is equivalent to reproduction-- an entire new organism is created. On a larger scale, mitotic cell division can create progeny from multicellular organisms, such as plants that grow from cuttings. Cell division also enables sexually reproducing organisms to develop from the one-celled zygote, which itself was produced by cell division from gametes. And after growth, cell division allows for continual construction and repair of the organism. A human being's body experiences about 10,000 trillion cell divisions in a lifetime.

The primary concern of cell division is the maintenance of the original cell's genome. Before division can occur, the genomic information which is stored in chromosomes must be replicated, and the duplicated genome separated cleanly between cells. A great deal of cellular infrastructure is involved in keeping genomic information consistent between "generations".

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA