Neuroscience

Mapping the mouse brain, and by extension, the human brain too

The circuits of the human brain contain more than 100 billion neurons, each linked to many other neurons via thousands of synaptic connections, resulting in a three-pound organ that is profoundly more complex than the sum ...

Medical research

Programming synthetic exosomes to optimize wound healing

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg and colleagues at the DWI Leibniz Institute for Interactive Materials in Aachen have engineered synthetic exosomes that regulate cellular signaling ...

Medications

A berry vine found in Asia proves useful in combating lung cancer

Lung cancer is known to be the most fatal form of cancer. Chemicals like 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) found in tobacco are usually the main culprits behind smoking-related lung cancer, causing cancer ...

Cardiology

Finding inspiration to rebuild human heart muscle

Advances in cardiac tissue engineering offer hope for an array of useful applications, from heart repair to disease modeling. As part of active, ongoing research related to bioengineering functional human organs, Adam Feinberg ...

Oncology & Cancer

What makes some immune cells better at killing melanoma

T cells rely on surface proteins called T cell receptors (TCRs) to bind to and destroy viruses, cancer cells, and other invaders in the body. T cells that infiltrate tumors, however, can have varied, sometimes ineffective ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

An astounding find reveals a rare cause of epilepsy

Researchers at The University of Queensland, working to gain a better understanding of how brain cells work, have discovered the underlying mechanism of a rare genetic mutation that can cause epilepsy.

Oncology & Cancer

Novel class of drugs may help treat deadly lymphoma

A new class of drugs that inhibits a 'master switch' involved in the vast majority of cases of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), a fatal subtype of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, has been discovered by researchers at Mount Sinai.

Neuroscience

Scientists unravel the function of a sight-saving growth factor

Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have determined how certain short protein fragments, called peptides, can protect neuronal cells found in the light-sensing retina layer at the back of the eye. The peptides ...

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