Parkinson's & Movement disorders

Parkinson's disease is also present in the blood

The behaviour of immune cells in the blood is so different in patients with Parkinson's disease that it advocates for a new type of supplementary medicine, which can regulate the immune system and thus inhibit the deterioration ...

Cardiology

Defective cilia linked to heart valve birth defects

Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most common heart valve birth defect and one of the most common birth defects of any type, affecting around 70 million people worldwide. A healthy aortic valve has three leaflets; in BAV ...

Neuroscience

Scientists reverse aging process in rat brain stem cells

New research, published today in Nature, reveals how increasing brain stiffness as we age causes brain stem cell dysfunction, and demonstrates new ways to reverse older stem cells to a younger, healthier state.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

New window on fibrosis

DDR1 is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)—a cell surface receptor—that regulates multiple functions including the maintenance of the normal structure of tissues, but which also contributes to pathological conditions including ...

Medical research

Tumor macrophage marker offers unique target for treatment

Macrophages are white blood cells that accumulate in tumors, where they aid cancer progression. Now scientists have identified a surface protein found only on the macrophages residing in tumors, exposing a target for precise ...

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Receptor (biochemistry)

In biochemistry, a receptor is a protein molecule, embedded in either the plasma membrane or cytoplasm of a cell, to which a mobile signaling (or "signal") molecule may attach. A molecule which binds to a receptor is called a "ligand," and may be a peptide (such as a neurotransmitter), a hormone, a pharmaceutical drug, or a toxin, and when such binding occurs, the receptor undergoes a conformational change which ordinarily initiates a cellular response. However, some ligands merely block receptors without inducing any response (e.g. antagonists). Ligand-induced changes in receptors result in physiological changes which constitute the biological activity of the ligands.

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