Immunology

How sugar promotes inflammation

People who consume sugar and other carbohydrates in excess over a long period of time have an increased risk of developing an autoimmune disease. In affected patients, the immune system attacks the body's own tissue and the ...

Medical research

Unusual partners aid blood vessel growth

Insufficient oxygen to an area like the heart or legs, called hypoxia, is a cue to our bodies to make more blood vessels, and scientists have found some unusual partners are key to making that happen.

Oncology & Cancer

New precision technology for human glioma immunotherapy

In recent years, great advances have been made in the development of new successful immunotherapies to treat cancer. CAR T-cell therapy and antibody treatments are two types of targeted immunotherapies that have revolutionized ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Hospital room surfaces pose low risk of spreading SARS-CoV-2

Hospital rooms where COVID patients were treated had little to no active virus contaminations on surfaces, according to a study at Duke University Hospital that adds to the body of research on how the pandemic respiratory ...

page 1 from 39

Receptor (biochemistry)

In biochemistry, a receptor is a protein molecule, embedded in either the plasma membrane or cytoplasm of a cell, to which a mobile signaling (or "signal") molecule may attach. A molecule which binds to a receptor is called a "ligand," and may be a peptide (such as a neurotransmitter), a hormone, a pharmaceutical drug, or a toxin, and when such binding occurs, the receptor undergoes a conformational change which ordinarily initiates a cellular response. However, some ligands merely block receptors without inducing any response (e.g. antagonists). Ligand-induced changes in receptors result in physiological changes which constitute the biological activity of the ligands.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA