Oncology & Cancer

Cancer cells deactivate their 'Velcro' to go on the attack

Cancer cells remain clumped together via a sort of 'Velcro' which allows them to adhere to each other wherever they appear. In order for cancer cells to leave a tumour and spread throughout the body during metastatic processes, ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Why don't antibodies guarantee immunity?

With millions of COVID-19 cases reported across the globe, people are turning to antibody tests to find out whether they have been exposed to the coronavirus that causes the disease. But what are antibodies? Why are they ...

Genetics

Single mutation leads to big effects in autism-related gene

A new study in Neuron offers clues to why autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is more common in boys than in girls. National Institutes of Health scientists found that a single amino acid change in the NLGN4 gene, which has been ...

Oncology & Cancer

Eye and the scalpel: Ocular tumors easier to diagnose noninvasively

Australia is the sunniest continent on Earth—which is why it also has the highest rates of skin cancer. But plentiful sunlight is also likely responsible for the lesser known ocular surface cancer, which occurs when abnormal ...

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Receptor (biochemistry)

In biochemistry, a receptor is a protein molecule, embedded in either the plasma membrane or cytoplasm of a cell, to which a mobile signaling (or "signal") molecule may attach. A molecule which binds to a receptor is called a "ligand," and may be a peptide (such as a neurotransmitter), a hormone, a pharmaceutical drug, or a toxin, and when such binding occurs, the receptor undergoes a conformational change which ordinarily initiates a cellular response. However, some ligands merely block receptors without inducing any response (e.g. antagonists). Ligand-induced changes in receptors result in physiological changes which constitute the biological activity of the ligands.

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