Medical research

A small T cell switch with a big impact

T cells play a key role in the human immune system. They are capable of distinguishing diseased or foreign tissue from the body's own, healthy tissue with great accuracy; they are capable of triggering the actions necessary ...

Medications

Malaria drug chloroquine does not inhibit SARS-CoV-2

More than 600,000 people worldwide have fallen victim to the lung disease COVID-19 so far, which is caused by the SARS coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). In order to obtain an effective therapy for COVID-19 as quickly as possible, ...

Oncology & Cancer

How breast cancer cells sneak past local immune defenses

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) Associate Professor Mikala Egeblad and her colleagues describe a newly understood way by which breast cancer cells sabotage a key player in the body's immune system. That key player provides ...

Neuroscience

How ApoE4 endangers the brain

Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is kind of like a delivery service for the human brain. It supplies neurons with important nutrients, including with polyunsaturated fatty acids—which are building blocks of the membranes surrounding ...

page 1 from 35

Receptor (biochemistry)

In biochemistry, a receptor is a protein molecule, embedded in either the plasma membrane or cytoplasm of a cell, to which a mobile signaling (or "signal") molecule may attach. A molecule which binds to a receptor is called a "ligand," and may be a peptide (such as a neurotransmitter), a hormone, a pharmaceutical drug, or a toxin, and when such binding occurs, the receptor undergoes a conformational change which ordinarily initiates a cellular response. However, some ligands merely block receptors without inducing any response (e.g. antagonists). Ligand-induced changes in receptors result in physiological changes which constitute the biological activity of the ligands.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA