Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Coronary heart disease risk higher with COPD

Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are more likely to have coronary heart disease (CHD), but no specific phenotypes have a higher risk, according to a study published online April 27 in PLOS ONE.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

USPSTF still advises against COPD screening for asymptomatic adults

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends against screening asymptomatic adults for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This recommendation forms the basis of a final recommendation statement published ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

COPD mortality rates for women remained unchanged from 1999 to 2019

From 1999 to 2019, there was no change in overall age-adjusted chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mortality rates among women, while small decreases were seen in the rates for men, according to research published ...

Medical research

Stopping lung damage before it turns deadly

If you've ever struggled to breathe, you've had a moment of hypoxia—a lack of oxygen. Hypoxia can have long-term effects. In fact, doctors describe hypoxia as an "initial insult."

Medications

Promising biologic drug for treating chronic lung disease

NUS scientists have discovered a novel property of a protein found in human lungs that could lead to the development of biologic drugs to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a debilitating, progressive lung ...

Medications

First generic of symbicort receives FDA approval

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the first generic of Symbicort (budesonide and formoterol fumarate dihydrate) Inhalation Aerosol to treat asthma in patients 6 years and older and for maintenance treatment in ...

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Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) refers to chronic bronchitis and emphysema, a pair of two commonly co-existing diseases of the lungs in which the airways become narrowed. This leads to a limitation of the flow of air to and from the lungs causing shortness of breath. In contrast to asthma, the limitation of airflow is poorly reversible and usually gets progressively worse over time.

COPD is caused by noxious particles or gas, most commonly from smoking, which trigger an abnormal inflammatory response in the lung. The inflammatory response in the larger airways is known as chronic bronchitis, which is diagnosed clinically when people regularly cough up sputum. In the alveoli, the inflammatory response causes destruction of the tissues of the lung, a process known as emphysema. The natural course of COPD is characterized by occasional sudden worsenings of symptoms called acute exacerbations, most of which are caused by infections or air pollution.

The diagnosis of COPD requires lung function tests. Important management strategies are smoking cessation, vaccinations, rehabilitation, and drug therapy (often using inhalers). Some patients go on to requiring long-term oxygen therapy or lung transplantation.

Worldwide, COPD ranked sixth as the cause of death in 1990. It is projected to be the third leading cause of death worldwide by 2020 due to an increase in smoking rates and demographic changes in many countries. COPD is the 4th leading cause of death in the U.S., and the economic burden of COPD in the U.S. in 2007 was $42.6 billion in health care costs and lost productivity.

COPD is also known as chronic obstructive lung disease (COLD), chronic obstructive airway disease (COAD), chronic airflow limitation (CAL) and chronic obstructive respiratory disease.

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