Cardiology

COVID-19 linked to heart inflammation in college athletes

A small but significant percentage of college athletes with COVID-19 develop myocarditis, a potentially dangerous inflammation of the heart muscle, that can only be seen on cardiac MRI, according to a study being presented ...

Overweight & Obesity

Almost 1 in every 3 college-age Americans are now obese

It's probably fair to say that most people know of the so-called "Freshman 15"—the weight that college students are often said to gain when they're away from home for the first time.

Neuroscience

Researchers identify new biomarker of Alzheimer's disease

A study of large-scale functional brain network organization and educational history, led by researchers at the Center for Vital Longevity (CVL), has identified a new biomarker of Alzheimer's disease. The findings, published ...

Surgery

Number of elderly on U.S. liver transplant list rising

(HealthDay)—The proportion of U.S. elderly patients in need of liver transplant (LT) is sharply increasing, according to a study presented at The Liver Meeting, the annual meeting of the American Association for the Study ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Safe Thanksgiving playbook as new COVID surge expected

As the U.S. braces for a new surge of COVID-19 cases expected to start hitting around Thanksgiving, Northwestern Medicine experts offer a playbook to a safe holiday gathering.

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College

College (Latin: collegium) is a term most often used today to denote degree awarding tertiary educational institution. More broadly, it can be the name of any group of colleagues, for example, an electoral college, a College of Arms or the College of Cardinals. Originally, it meant a group of persons living together, under a common set of rules (con- = "together" + leg- = "law" or lego = "I choose"); indeed, some colleges call their members "fellows". The precise usage of the term varies among the English-speaking countries. In the United States, for example, the terms 'college' and 'university' may be regarded as loosely interchangeable, whereas in the United Kingdom, Ireland and Australia, a 'college' is usually an institution between school and university level (although constituent schools within universities are also known as 'colleges').

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