Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Tuberculosis—Inhibiting host cell death with immunotherapy

Tuberculosis treatment still entails the administration of several antibiotics over a period of months and is torturous for many patients. The pathogen's increasing multidrug resistance additionally complicates this lengthy ...

Immunology

A breath of fresh air for severe asthma research

Ten to 15 percent of people with asthma have severe asthma, a form of the disease that is not controlled by current medications. Many of these patients are prescribed increased dosages of corticosteroids, but continue to ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Fungal infections can trigger and exacerbate asthma

(Medical Xpress)—A common fungal infection can trigger asthma and make it much worse by way of a route not targeted by existing asthma drugs, report researchers at Boston Children's Hospital. Their findings, published online ...

Medical research

New Way to Fight Fungal Infection

(PhysOrg.com) -- A team of researchers led by Amy G. Hise, M.D., M.P.H., assistant professor at the Center for Global Health and Diseases at Case Western Reserve University's School of Medicine, has discovered how the body ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Vitamin D may halt lung function decline in asthma and COPD

Vitamin D may slow the progressive decline in the ability to breathe that can occur in people with asthma as a result of human airway smooth muscle (HASM) proliferation, according to researchers at the University of Pennsylvania.

page 1 from 18

Corticosteroid

Corticosteroids are a class of steroid hormones that are produced in the adrenal cortex. Corticosteroids are involved in a wide range of physiologic systems such as stress response, immune response and regulation of inflammation, carbohydrate metabolism, protein catabolism, blood electrolyte levels, and behavior.

Some common natural hormones are corticosterone (C21H30O4), cortisone (C21H28O5, 17-hydroxy-11-dehydrocorticosterone) and aldosterone.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA