Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

'Caution fatigue' could dent efforts to stay safe

As people enter what feels like the umpteenth week of social distancing and isolation with no end in sight, they may find it more difficult to stay on high-risk alert as "caution fatigue" sets in, says a psychologist from ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Hair in "stress": analyse with care

Similar to humans, wild animals' reaction to disturbance is accompanied by releasing hormones, including cortisol. To understand the impact of various stress factors on wildlife—for example, competition for food, encounters ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Researchers find flooding stress impacts unborn children

NDSU researchers have discovered differences in child development based on how close mothers are to flooding during their pregnancies. The new study found that being pregnant near flooding has an impact on child development ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Compassion training for parents may reduce their children's stress

A new study from researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison shows that the young children of parents who take part in a compassion-based training program develop lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol over ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Chronic adversity dampens dopamine production

People exposed to a lifetime of psychosocial adversity may have an impaired ability to produce the dopamine levels needed for coping with acutely stressful situations.

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Cortisol

Cortisol is a corticosteroid hormone or glucocorticoid produced by the adrenal cortex, that is part of the adrenal gland (in the zona fasciculata and the zona reticularis of the adrenal cortex). It is usually referred to as the "stress hormone" as it is involved in response to stress and anxiety, controlled by CRH. It increases blood pressure and blood sugar, and reduces immune responses. Various synthetic forms of cortisol are used to treat a variety of different illnesses. The most well-known of these are a natural metabolic intermediary of cortisol named hydrocortisone. When first introduced as a treatment for rheumatoid arthritis, hydrocortisone was referred to as Compound E.

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