Dentistry

Soda and illegal drugs cause similar damage to teeth

Addicted to soda? You may be shocked to learn that drinking large quantities of your favorite carbonated soda could be as damaging to your teeth as methamphetamine and crack cocaine use. The consumption of illegal drugs and ...

Pediatrics

'Crack baby' scare overblown, teen research says

Research in teens adds fresh evidence that the 1980s "crack baby" scare was overblown, finding little proof of any major long-term ill effects in children whose mothers used cocaine during pregnancy.

Dentistry

Excessive soda can mimic illicit drug use effects on teeth

(HealthDay)—Manifestation of dental erosion caused by illicit drug use or excessive soda consumption needs to be distinguished from dental caries, according to case studies published in the March/April issue of General ...

Addiction

Crack cocaine wreaks havoc in Rio shantytown

Firecrackers and sporadic gunfire greeted the police-escorted social workers as they drove into northern Rio's Jacarezinho shantytown, home to a large population of crack cocaine addicts.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

TB outbreaks could be 'solved' by DNA tracking

Reconstructing the spread of killer diseases such as tuberculosis (TB) from person to person using DNA sequencing quickly identifies the origin and movement of pathogens. This approach is directly informing public health ...

Medical research

Cocaine vaccine gets a boost with molecular imaging

Addicts unable to kick a cocaine habit could one day be vaccinated against cocaine and see proof with a molecular imaging technique that shows how the vaccine prompts antibodies to whisk away the drug before it can reach ...

Addiction

Study of 'meth babies' finds behavior problems

The first study to look at methamphetamine's potential lasting effects on children whose mothers used it in pregnancy finds these kids at higher risk for behavior problems than other children.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Current, not prior, depression predicts crack cocaine use

(Medical Xpress) -- Women who are clinically depressed at the time they enter drug court have a substantially higher risk of using crack cocaine within four months, according to a new study. Because current but not past depression ...

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