Obstetrics & gynaecology

What to know about chronic pelvic pain

For many women, pelvic pain is an uncomfortable, frustrating part of their everyday life. This pain can be caused by pelvic venous congestion syndrome (PVCS), also known as pelvic venous disease.

Oncology & Cancer

Biosensors for quick assessment of cancer treatment

Immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) inhibitors have transformed the treatment of cancer and have become the frontline therapy for a broad range of malignancies. It's because they work better than the previous standard of care.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Drug halts immune reactions to save damaged lungs

A team of scientists led by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have discovered that disulfiram, an FDA-approved drug, prevents the immune system from producing toxic webs known as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). ...

Health informatics

AI to help doctors treat deafness

One out of five patients with hearing loss, severe hearing impairment or who were born deaf, have deformations in the inner ear, and could benefit from having an advanced hearing aid known as a cochlear implant (CI) implanted. ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Worth a thousand words: Automated diagnosis of COVID-19 from chest CTs

The current gold standard for COVID-19 diagnosis is a nasal swab followed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. But such tests are time consuming, requiring days before results are available. This wastes crucial ...

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Computed tomography

Computed tomography (CT) is a medical imaging method employing tomography. Digital geometry processing is used to generate a three-dimensional image of the inside of an object from a large series of two-dimensional X-ray images taken around a single axis of rotation. The word "tomography" is derived from the Greek tomos (slice) and graphein (to write). Computed tomography was originally known as the "EMI scan" as it was developed at a research branch of EMI, a company best known today for its music and recording business. It was later known as computed axial tomography (CAT or CT scan) and body section röntgenography.

CT produces a volume of data which can be manipulated, through a process known as "windowing", in order to demonstrate various bodily structures based on their ability to block the X-ray/Röntgen beam. Although historically the images generated were in the axial or transverse plane, orthogonal to the long axis of the body, modern scanners allow this volume of data to be reformatted in various planes or even as volumetric (3D) representations of structures. Although most common in medicine, CT is also used in other fields, such as nondestructive materials testing. Another example is the DigiMorph project at the University of Texas at Austin which uses a CT scanner to study biological and paleontological specimens.

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