Overweight & Obesity

160 million years of life lost to obesity in 2019

Researchers at the National University in Singapore and colleagues in the US and China undertook a two-decade metabolic analysis of Global Burden of Disease (GBD) reports. They have published their findings in the journal ...

Neuroscience

Head injury is associated with doubled mortality rate long-term

Adults who suffered any head injury during a 30-year study period had two times the rate of mortality than those who did not have any head injury, and mortality rates among those with moderate or severe head injuries were ...

Health informatics

Study traces an infectious language epidemic

"Sticks and stones may break my bones," the old adage goes. "But words will never hurt me." Tell that to Eugenia Rho, assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science, and she will show you extensive data that prove ...

Health

Doctor Who festive specials linked to lower death rates

A new "Doctor Who" episode shown during the festive period, especially on Christmas Day, is associated with lower death rates in the subsequent year across the UK, finds a study published in the Christmas issue of The BMJ.

page 1 from 40

Mortality rate

Mortality rate is a measure of the number of deaths (in general, or due to a specific cause) in some population, scaled to the size of that population, per unit time. Mortality rate is typically expressed in units of deaths per 1000 individuals per year; thus, a mortality rate of 9.5 in a population of 100,000 would mean 950 deaths per year in that entire population. It is distinct from morbidity rate, which refers to the number of individuals in poor health during a given time period (the prevalence rate) or the number who currently have that disease (the incidence rate), scaled to the size of the population.

One distinguishes:

In regard to the success or failure of medical treatment or procedures, one would also distinguish:

Note that the crude death rate as defined above and applied to a whole population can give a misleading impression. The crude death rate depends on the age (and gender) specific mortality rates and the age (and gender) distribution of the population. The number of deaths per 1000 people can be higher for developed nations than in less-developed countries, despite life expectancy being higher in developed countries due to standards of health being better. This happens because developed countries typically have a completely different population age distribution, with a much higher proportion of older people, due to both lower recent birth rates and lower mortality rates. A more complete picture of mortality is given by a life table which shows the mortality rate separately for each age. A life table is necessary to give a good estimate of life expectancy.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA